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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 13, 2024 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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finance experts say the post office may have underpaid more than £100 million in tax while overpaying top executives. and have you heard of a recruitment scam? they're on the rise and costing victims record amounts. we'll find out what you can do to protect yourself. good morning. furore over var again, as luton leave it late to snatch a point in the relegation battle at burnley, but there's anger that the goal was allowed to stand, with the hosts protesting that their keeper was fouled. morning, all. it is a rather quiet start to the weekend. we will be chasing cloudier mount surround to begin with enabling across england and wales. more sunshine coming through for scotland and northern and it will start to feel colder, particularly for the second half of the weekend. i will have all the details on that coming up shortly. good morning.
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it's saturday, 13th january. our main story: the united states has confirmed it's carried out a fresh strike on a houthi target in yemen overnight, a day after both the us and uk carried out a series of raids on the iran—backed group. the operation follows an attack by houthi rebels on commercial shipping vessels in the red sea. the group have said attacks in yemen will not go without "punishment or retaliation". graham satchell reports. before and after — satellite images show the impact of the american and british bombing raids. the americans say airfields and weapons storage depots were destroyed. the raf didn't take part in the attack overnight, but both the british and americans say the raids are vital to keep shipping routes open in the red sea. houthi militia have been targeting container ships off the yemeni coast for weeks. sometimes, like this, they have boarded vessels.
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in other attacks, they used drones and missiles. they say they are disrupting this key shipping route to show their support for palestinians in gaza. yemen sits at a key strategic position in the middle east, especially for global shipping. the normal route from the far east goes around the coast of yemen, through the red sea and the suez canal. it has been significantly disrupted. most vessels are now taking the longer route around southern africa. it means delay and extra cost to global commerce. a huge rally in the yemeni capital, sana'a. protesters burned the american and israeli flags. millions in yemen and across the arab world are appalled by israel's conduct of the war in gaza, and they see the current airstrikes by the west as an escalation. a houthi military spokesman said british and american
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criminal aggression would not go unanswered or unpunished. the americans maintain airstrikes are a proportionate response, and they are talking down a wider conflict. we absolutely do not want to see an extension of the conflict in gaza broader into the region and will continue to work hard on that. but at the same time, we can't allow the houthis to continue to conduct these attacks, putting innocent mariners�* lives at risk and affecting the global economy. the houthis are backed but not controlled by iran. the clear worry now is that what's happening in gaza and the red sea spreads and escalates to the wider region. graham satchell, bbc news. and we will have more coverage of that throughout the programme. it is
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6:04am. we will focus on the post office. we have had the rise this week but other details are coming through. week but other details are coming throu~h. , , ., , ., ., week but other details are coming throu. h. , , ., , . ., . through. this story related to tax and how much — through. this story related to tax and how much tax _ through. this story related to tax and how much tax has _ through. this story related to tax and how much tax has been - through. this story related to tax i and how much tax has been paid. the post office may have underpaid more than £100 million in tax while overpaying its senior executives. that's according to experts the tax policy associates, who say the post office paid less tax by deducting payments to victims of the horizon it scandal from its profits. they say this could be a possible breach of tax law. here's our business editor simonjack to explain. what they have been doing is deducting compensation due to victims of the scandal from their reported profits, thereby lowering, in some cases wiping out, their tax bill. now, tax experts have told us that may be a breach of tax law, that may be a breach of tax law, that you are not normally allowed to deduct fines or compensation for unlawful acts from your profits, there are non— tax—deductible, as a
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result the death of may over £100 million in unpaid tax. now, in effect the government will just have to step in and supported as it has in the past, there is another dimension to this, whereas they have included those payments out when it comes to reporting profits, they have stripped them out when it comes to executive pay and bonuses, ignoring those payments, which means they have been boosting the salary and the bonuses of those executives. now, leading tax lawyer dan needle, said to me, he is from tax associates, if a public company had done this, if a private plc had done this, then the shareholders would be asking for the heads of their senior executives on a platter. simonjack reporting there. donald trump has been ordered to pay the new york times more than £300,000 for a failed lawsuit after accusing the newspaper of "an insidious plot" to obtain his tax records. mr trump's case was dismissed last year and on friday he was ordered to repay the publication's legal fees. the series of articles on the former president's financial affairs won a pulitzer prize.
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the rate of deforestation in the amazon rainforest halved in 2023, falling to its lowest level in five years. it is home to around three million species of plants and animals and is said to be crucial in the fight against climate change. brazil's president has pledged to end deforestation by 2030. people in taiwan are voting for a new president today in elections seen as a core test of the island's relationship with china. the territory rules itself but is claimed by mainland china. 0ur reporter shaimaa khalil in the taiwanese capital of taipei. a very good morning to you. so, voting under and what clearly is a important election. it voting under and what clearly is a important election.— important election. it is. good morning. _ important election. it is. good morning, charlie. _ important election. it is. good morning, charlie. i've - important election. it is. good morning, charlie. i've had - important election. it is. good morning, charlie. i've had it. important election. it is. good i morning, charlie. i've had it been described as the big deal, the big
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one for this is a highly consequential election because at the heart of it is the tussle for regional influence between united states and china and taiwan is in the middle of it will drop beijing claims taiwan as its own. the united states is taiwan as a very important ally and also sees it as an ally in countering china's growing assertiveness and influence in the region. the ruling dpp are going for a record that time in power and if that happens we are likely to see a continuation of them asserting themselves as a self—governing island away from beating's orbit and closer to the united states, that continues waenga china. the opposition are offering better ties with beijing, a dialogue with china, and we have a third party as well bowing for the top job, seen as the middle of the road, very popular with young people who are not pleased with the big two parties, they have told me, young people, that there are a lot of internal issues, the economy, employment, housing. i havejust spoken
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issues, the economy, employment, housing. i have just spoken to issues, the economy, employment, housing. i havejust spoken to eva svoboda who say they really need to sort out housing for young people, we cannot get into the market. so all of this is happening as the world is watching. remember, this is the first big election in a very big election year ahead. so when observers say the eyes of the world are in taiwan, it is not essentially just figurative. so this is an election that is happening against a very, very tense geo—political back drop between this two big world powers who were watching what is going to happen here.— powers who were watching what is going to happen here. thank you very much. there's been a huge rise in the amount of money stolen by scammers advertising fake jobs. according to action fraud, con artists send out text and whatsapp messages to people, offering them roles with a high wages and then trick them into handing over banking and card details. dan whitworth from radio 4's money box has more. like many frauds, this is a numbers game, millions of scam messages get sent out and most are ignored. but
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itjust sent out and most are ignored. but it just takes sent out and most are ignored. but itjust takes one to have the right person at the right time as someone looking for a job or wanting to earn more money, for criminals to seize their opportunity. ella was caught out after she lost herjob and had boasted a cv online, and after dozens of follow—up messages and phone calls over several days, she had £3000 stolen. i phone calls over several days, she had £3000 stolen.— phone calls over several days, she had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, _ had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, if _ had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, if there _ had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, if there was - had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, if there was a - had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i j could stop them, if there was a way of sorting out, had no idea how they'd access the account, really, it was, yeah, three months worth of work, 55 hour weeks, so why was really distraught and upset. last ear, 126 really distraught and upset. last year. 126 peeple _ really distraught and upset. last year, 126 people contacted action fraud to report being caught by this scam. nearly £1 million were stolen, 50 times as much as the year before. city of london police, the national
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league forfraud, city of london police, the national league for fraud, says these numbers are likely to be the tip of the iceberg as most dems don't report fraud because of feelings of embarrassment and shame. people on the outside that _ embarrassment and shame. people on the outside that aren't _ embarrassment and shame. people on the outside that aren't looking - embarrassment and shame. people on the outside that aren't looking for- the outside that aren't looking for jobs, that aren't motivated respond, sometimes they don't understand how people become victim of this type of crime, but, really, when we think about it, if you are concerned about about it, if you are concerned about a message or you think there are alarm bells going up, that fraud is not going to get you. the fraud that gets you is the fraud that makes sense, and that is what these criminals do so well. if sense, and that is what these criminals do so well.- sense, and that is what these criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages _ criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages the _ criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages the advice - criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages the advice is . criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages the advice is to | of these messages the advice is to ignore it, reported, you can forward scam texts 27726 and then delete it. dan whitworth, bbc news. scripts from two episodes of friends that were found in a bin have sold for £22,000 at auction. i. i, ross... take the, emily. take
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the, i, ross... take the, emily. take the. rachel- _ the drafts were for the season fourfinale, set in the uk in 1998, and were discovered by a staff member at fountain studios, where the episodes were filmed. auctioneers is a super fence apparently went crazy when thing began. —— say super fence. apparently went crazy when thing began. —— say superfence. i think they seen that episode dozens of times. and every time i said isil go "0h!" when he says racial�*s name. i "0h!" when he says racial's name. i don't remember that, so... "0h!" when he says racial's name. i don't rememberthat, so... —— ice still go. i don't remember that episode. i still go. i don't remember that eisode. , ., , , episode. i remember that episode but they haven't — episode. i remember that episode but they haven't seen _ episode. i remember that episode but they haven't seen the _ episode. i remember that episode but they haven't seen the one _ episode. i remember that episode but they haven't seen the one after- they haven't seen the one after that. it they haven't seen the one after that. . , , they haven't seen the one after that. ., , , ., , they haven't seen the one after that. , ., ., . they haven't seen the one after that. ., ., that. it was “ust as traumatic. that is the 'o that. it was “ust as traumatic. that is the joy of— that. it was just as traumatic. that is the joy of friends. _ that. it was just as traumatic. that is the joy of friends. beautiful- is the joy of friends. beautiful picture, louise, lovely reflections, lovely lie, but cold. fix, picture, louise, lovely reflections, lovely lie, but cold.— lovely lie, but cold. a beautiful start to the _ lovely lie, but cold. a beautiful start to the weekend. -
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lovely lie, but cold. a beautiful start to the weekend. but - lovely lie, but cold. a beautiful. start to the weekend. but things lovely lie, but cold. a beautiful - start to the weekend. but things are going to get colder still and a little bit tricky as well. bear with us, it will get interesting of the next few days. but enjoy today, not too bad, mostly dry, we will be chasing cloudier mount surround, as it, high pressure that has been with us or we is drifting off to the west and these weather fronts toppling across the high will bring a little more in the way of cloud, this first one, the second one is starting to introduce cold air, so almost like it leaves the back door open and this cold air all the way down from the arctic floods steadily southwards, it will get colder steel and that means we can see some snow showers at lower levels for some of us, not for all. showers at lower levels for some of us, not forall. forthe showers at lower levels for some of us, not for all. for the time being, as the cold front sinks south, very weak affair, no rain, to band of cloud across england and wales, steadily breaking up through northern england, much of scotland into the afternoon, a few scattered showers into the far north—west of scotland, but these will be arraigned throughout the day today, it won't be quite as cold yet stop we are looking generally at about
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4-8 , but we are looking generally at about 4—8 , but obviously if you have that cloud is not going to feel particularly pleasant out there. so that grey story continues through the night. that will probably prevent too much of a frost here. some clear skies further north, some pockets of mist and fog and some frost and certainly a cold start to the day into the far north of scotland. in rural parts will see temperatures just below freezing. it will be a cold start and the cold is starting to kick in. some of the showers will start to turn wintry at lower levels, will start to see some snow showers and the far north of scotland. elsewhere, sunny spells for many of us. hopefully that normally when helping to break that cloud up and temperatures generally at around 3— seven celsius, the colder is that do stay with us right throughout the week and so there is a greater chance of seeing further snow showers at lower levels. we could see as much as ten centimetres starting to build up across the far north of scotland, that will be enough to see some disruption. as we go through the day most of those
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snow showers santa the far north until the end of the day and into tuesday, there is the potential to see another little front running into that cold air and so the snow risk than just into that cold air and so the snow risk thanjust think into that cold air and so the snow risk than just think that little bit further south into northern ireland and northern england. is that it would get pretty messy. now, if you have been watching before because you will know we have been talking about the potential for another speu about the potential for another spell of snow down to the south, from this area of low pressure on wednesday, but at the moment, computer models want to keep it in the near continent and mist us, still a lot of uncertainty, will need to keep watching the forecast, that could still change. but at the moment it doesn't look likely we will see that much in the way of disruptive across england and wales down to the south. but certainly as we go through the week ahead it will be cold. there is a greater risk of snow showers at lower levels, particular into the far north, and if you have not got the snow it will be bitterly cold and frosty overnight. back to you two. thanks very much- — overnight. back to you two. thanks very much- see _ overnight. back to you two. thanks very much. see you _ overnight. back to you two. thanks very much. see you later— overnight. back to you two. thanks very much. see you later on. - let's take a look at today's papers.
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many lead on the reaction to the uk and us strikes on houthi rebels in yemen. the times' headline says the rebels are "on the warpath", with the paper reporting that the british military is poised for retaliatory attacks on uk ships in the red sea. and the mirror also leads on the story, with its headline focusing on the "high price of the conflict". it quotes an "intelligence expert" who says there is the potential for a terror backlash against the uk, as well as increased household bills, if there is continued disruption to shipping. let's look at the financial times. a story we were reporting on earlier — it reports that the post office now "risks a £100 million bill" after claiming tax relief on compensation it paid to victims of the horizon it scandal. and the daily mail includes sections of a new book by the author robert hardman, which reportedly includes a memo from queen elizabeth ii's most senior aide detailing the day she died.
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its front page quotes him as saying "she simply passed away". picking out a couple of things on taste and smell. how good is your sense of taste and smell? i taste and smell. how good is your sense of taste and smell?- sense of taste and smell? i would sa re sense of taste and smell? i would say pretty good- _ sense of taste and smell? i would say pretty good. 0k. _ sense of taste and smell? i would say pretty good. 0k. what - sense of taste and smell? i would say pretty good. 0k. what is - sense of taste and smell? i would say pretty good. 0k. what is yourj say pretty good. 0k. what is your favourite winter _ say pretty good. 0k. what is your favourite winter smell? _ say pretty good. 0k. what is your favourite winter smell? there - say pretty good. 0k. what is your favourite winter smell? there has been a bowl. == favourite winter smell? there has been a bowl-— favourite winter smell? there has been a bowl. -- poll. the smell of an 0 en been a bowl. -- poll. the smell of an open fire. _ been a bowl. -- poll. the smell of an open fire, the _ been a bowl. -- poll. the smell of an open fire, the countryside. - been a bowl. -- poll. the smell of. an open fire, the countryside. wood smoke. . , . an open fire, the countryside. wood smoke. ., , ., an open fire, the countryside. wood smoke. ., ., ., ., ~ smoke. that is a good one. that rank totall . smoke. that is a good one. that rank totally- the — smoke. that is a good one. that rank totally- the ten _ smoke. that is a good one. that rank totally. the top ranks _ smoke. that is a good one. that rank totally. the top ranks smell- smoke. that is a good one. that rank totally. the top ranks smell was - totally. the top ranks smell was gingerbread. i totally. the top ranks smell was gingerbread-— totally. the top ranks smell was gingerbread. totally. the top ranks smell was ”inerbread. ., �* ., gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- ton-ranked- — gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- ton-ranked- i'm _ gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- top-ranked. i'm not _ gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- top-ranked. i'm not very _ gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- top-ranked. i'm not very keen - gingerbread. i wouldn't say that. -- top-ranked. i'm not very keen on i top—ranked. i'm not very keen on gingerbread on the whole. top-ranked. i'm not very keen on gingerbread on the whole. really? i love gingerbread. _ gingerbread on the whole. really? i love gingerbread. 0r— gingerbread on the whole. really? i love gingerbread. or ginger - gingerbread on the whole. really? i love gingerbread. or ginger cake. . gingerbread on the whole. really? i love gingerbread. or ginger cake. a| love gingerbread. 0r ginger cake. a thick, moist, duplicate. with strong ginger. thick, moist, duplicate. with strong auiner. ~ . thick, moist, duplicate. with strong ”iner_~ ., thick, moist, duplicate. with strong auiner. ~ ., ., ginger. what were some others? cinnamon and _ ginger. what were some others? cinnamon and pine _ ginger. what were some others? cinnamon and pine trees - ginger. what were some others? cinnamon and pine trees in - ginger. what were some others? i cinnamon and pine trees in second, gingerbread at the top. honey and
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lemon, baked potatoes. doughnuts. and it is slightly linked, this is in the times. french scientists have created the ultimate winetasting machine. it is done with artificial intelligence, a computer. the computer doesn't tell you of the wine is good, but it can distinguish all the grapes and from every bit of — every region, and every bit of land as well. that it comes from. it is called the terroir, expressed in the chemical composition of the wine. now it is like, do you need the human nose? to make you just need to know if you like it or not, thatis need to know if you like it or not, that is really it. —— need to know if you like it or not, that is really it. —- will need to know if you like it or not, that is really it. --_ that is really it. -- you “ust need to know stop * that is really it. -- you “ust need to know stop that _ that is really it. -- you “ust need to know stop that is _ that is really it. -- you just need to know stop that is using - that is really it. -- you just need to know stop that is using it. - that is really it. -- you just need to know stop that is using it. it l that is really it. -- you just need| to know stop that is using it. it is 6:18am now.
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-- you just need to know if you like it. | —— that is usually it. for the past few weeks we've been hearing the devastating stories of former sub—postmasters, whose lives were upended by the post office it scandal that left many bankrupt and with criminal convictions. now, former sub—postmaster gail ward has spoken for the first time on camera about what happened to her. fiona lamdin went to wells in somerset to hear gail's story. this is where it happened 17 years ago onjanuary11, 2007. at this is where it happened 17 years ago onjanuary 11, 2007. at 830 in the morning, when the auditors arrived. gail ward ran the morning, when the auditors arrived. gailward ran a the morning, when the auditors arrived. gail ward ran a post office for eight years, but in 2005, a0 software on a computer system called horizon when she had shortfalls every week. == horizon when she had shortfalls every week-— horizon when she had shortfalls every week. -- faulty. stressful, very stressful. _ every week. -- faulty. stressful, very stressful. you _ every week. -- faulty. stressful, very stressful. you had - every week. -- faulty. stressful, very stressful. you had to - every week. -- faulty. stressful, very stressful. you had to pressl every week. -- faulty. stressful, i very stressful. you had to press the button saying that you accepted the figures even knowing they were wrong. figures even knowing they were wronu. ~ . figures even knowing they were wron~.~ . , ., .,, wrong. what did the investigators sa ? wrong. what did the investigators say? "where _ wrong. what did the investigators say? "where is— wrong. what did the investigators say? "where is the _ wrong. what did the investigators say? "where is the money? - wrong. what did the investigators say? "where is the money? whatj wrong. what did the investigators - say? "where is the money? what have ou say? "where is the money? what have you bought? — say? "where is the money? what have you bought? ' — say? "where is the money? what have you bought? ' i — say? "where is the money? what have you bought? " i would _ say? "where is the money? what have you bought? " i would say _ say? "where is the money? what have you bought? " i would say "nothing. i you bought? " i would say "nothing. i haven't done anything. ” you bought? " i would say "nothing. i haven't done anything.— i haven't done anything. " she was told the post _ i haven't done anything. " she was told the post office _ i haven't done anything. " she was told the post office would - i haven't done anything. " she was told the post office would drop - i haven't done anything. " she wasj told the post office would drop the charge of theft if you pleaded
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guilty to false accounting. the solicitor phoned _ guilty to false accounting. iie: solicitor phoned saying was guilty to false accounting. ii2 solicitor phoned saying was i ready for court the following week. she said "don't forget to bring a bag with you with some personal items in it." i asked why and she said in case i wasn't coming home. what was it like saying — case i wasn't coming home. what was it like saying goodbye _ case i wasn't coming home. what was it like saying goodbye on _ case i wasn't coming home. what was it like saying goodbye on that - it like saying goodbye on that monday morning? it like saying goodbye on that monda mornin: ? ., ., , , monday morning? horrendous. they went to school. _ monday morning? horrendous. they went to school. went _ monday morning? horrendous. they went to school. went to _ monday morning? horrendous. they went to school. went to school - monday morning? horrendous. they went to school. went to school that l went to school. went to school that morning, not knowing if his parents would be there when he came home. gail was bad prison but given community service for a year, cleaning trains. i community service for a year, cleaning trains.— community service for a year, cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street- _ cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street. they _ cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street. they would - cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street. they would cross - cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street. they would cross or| the street. they would cross or there would be coming towards you, you know, it might be two of them, and you could see people spitting and you could see people spitting and pointing. that's the one. finally, in 2021, gail had her
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conviction overturned. but she has never received proper compensation. locals are now beginning to understand what gail went through. thank you. and i know you mean it. thank you. and i know you mean it. thank you. and i know you mean it. thank you. thank you. i wouldn't have got through it without my family. i am so lucky. compared to some, i am lucky. family. i am so lucky. compared to some, iam lucky. i family. i am so lucky. compared to some, i am lucky. i still have a wonderful husband. and here i am, still fighting. but i'm not on my own. because there are a lot of us. fiona lamdin, bbc news. 0ne one of the things you know there as well is you forget how key 0ne of the things you know there as well is you forget how key post— sub— masters were, ah, to communities. even getting that hung from someone in the community, saying we know what you are going through must mean so much. especially now there has been a collective recognition of the injustice. collective recognition of the
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in'ustice. ~ , ., ., collective recognition of the in'ustice. , ., ., ., injustice. we send our thanks to gail ward for _ injustice. we send our thanks to gail ward for sharing _ injustice. we send our thanks to gail ward for sharing her- injustice. we send our thanks to gail ward for sharing her story. | injustice. we send our thanks to l gail ward for sharing her story. it is 6:21am. two brothers say time is ticking — you will get it in a moment — to find an heir to take over their cuckoo clock museum, which features hundreds of quirky timepieces from around the world. roman and maz piekarski have devoted their lives to the collection, but now they want to find someone who's as passionate as they are to take up the mantle for when they retire, as ian haslam's been finding out. with more than 700 cuckoo clocks, this is the largest collection of its kind anywhere, and represents decades of collecting. we its kind anywhere, and represents decades of collecting.— decades of collecting. we eat, slee - , decades of collecting. we eat, sleep. and _ decades of collecting. we eat, sleep, and live _ decades of collecting. we eat, sleep, and live cuckoo - decades of collecting. we eat, sleep, and live cuckoo clocks. | decades of collecting. we eat, i sleep, and live cuckoo clocks. we absolutely love them.— sleep, and live cuckoo clocks. we absolutely love them. roman and his brother mazza _ absolutely love them. roman and his brother mazza grew _ absolutely love them. roman and his brother mazza grew up _ absolutely love them. roman and his brother mazza grew up around - absolutely love them. roman and his| brother mazza grew up around cuckoo clocks and served clockmaker apprenticeships, but they are worried about cooker and's future
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when the time runs out. == worried about cooker and's future when the time runs out. -- brother maz. we when the time runs out. -- brother maz- we didn't _ when the time runs out. -- brother maz. we didn't get _ when the time runs out. -- brother maz. we didn't get married - when the time runs out. -- brother maz. we didn't get married and - when the time runs out. -- brother maz. we didn't get married and we | maz. we didn't get married and we have nobody delivered too. we're getting to the age where we think we better find getting to the age where we think we betterfind someone to getting to the age where we think we better find someone to follow it on, keep it going. but better find someone to follow it on, keep it going-— keep it going. but their passion for cuckoo clocks _ keep it going. but their passion for cuckoo clocks is _ keep it going. but their passion for cuckoo clocks is undiminished. - keep it going. but their passion for cuckoo clocks is undiminished. my| cuckoo clocks is undiminished. ij�*i brother cuckoo clocks is undiminished. ii brother and cuckoo clocks is undiminished. i�*i1: brother and liked cuckoo clocks is undiminished. ii1 brother and liked to call cuckoo clocks is undiminished. ii1: brother and liked to call it cuckoo clocks is undiminished. ii1 brother and liked to call it the hunt. whatever we get the scent of a cooking pot, the matter where it is in the world, the hunt is the best part of it. everything you see was made within a 25 mile radius of the black forest in southern germany. you can't beat that. this is what i would call a statement cuckoo clock, given the size of the birds.— given the size of the birds. that's there. a given the size of the birds. that's there- a pigeon _ given the size of the birds. that's there. a pigeon club. _ given the size of the birds. that's there. a pigeon club. in - given the size of the birds. that's there. a pigeon club. in bygone l there. a pigeon club. in bygone centuries, these timepieces even provided entertainment. apparently in victorian times if they were having dinner parties and one of these pops out, one of the cuckoos, it would ignite the chatter, which
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had gone stale, because it would be like, "you have a cuckoo clock, how about that? " an event would flow. they would often ask where that came from. they very soon became very popular. —— and the banter would flow. they have come to us from america, even in australia. people leave their cultural restoration. 0ne leave their cultural restoration. one woman said to me goodbye, cedric. and i said no, my name is roman, and she said no, my clock is named cedric. the roman, and she said no, my clock is named cedric— named cedric. the work he will continue but _ named cedric. the work he will continue but the _ named cedric. the work he will continue but the long-term - named cedric. the work he will continue but the long-term is i continue but the long—term is unclear. continue but the long-term is unclear. ., . ., ., , unclear. for the collection to stay toether unclear. for the collection to stay together and _ unclear. for the collection to stay together and be _ unclear. for the collection to stay together and be looked _ unclear. for the collection to stay together and be looked after - unclear. for the collection to stay together and be looked after for i unclear. for the collection to stay i together and be looked after for all time, that is our dream. that is our dream. ., ., , ., time, that is our dream. that is our dream. ., ., �* ~ time, that is our dream. that is our dream. ., ., �* �* , clocks, right? will you try to make some...
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clocks, right? will you try to make some--- no. _ clocks, right? will you try to make some--- no. i— clocks, right? will you try to make some... no, i have— clocks, right? will you try to make some... no, i have a— clocks, right? will you try to make some... no, i have a good - clocks, right? will you try to make some... no, i have a good length. j some... no, i have a good length. the et some... no, i have a good length. the get the _ some... no, i have a good length. the get the pitch, _ some... no, i have a good length. the get the pitch, this _ some... no, i have a good length. the get the pitch, this isn't - some... no, i have a good length. the get the pitch, this isn't aboutl the get the pitch, this isn't about sport. mike has a link to everything. mike has experiences of everything. mike has experiences of everything. if you said to mike, "0h, we're talking about bulgarian swordfish," you have a story. when it comes to cuckoo clocks, tell me about your lithuanian... i upgraded to a blood clot _ about your lithuanian... i upgraded to a blood clot which _ about your lithuanian... i upgraded to a blood clot which happened - about your lithuanian... i upgraded to a blood clot which happened to l about your lithuanian... i upgraded i to a blood clot which happened to be from lithuania. maybe a cheaper version. —— bird clock. it had a different bird noise every hour. at three o'clock in the afternoon you'd have an hour, bad hours sound, and i loved it, but then i got together with someone, my present wife, and she hated it because i had to give it away. i she hated it because i had to give it awa . ., , ., she hated it because i had to give itawa. ., it away. i told you. do i was interested _ it away. i told you. do i was interested in _ it away. i told you. do i was interested in the _ it away. i told you. do i was interested in the piece - it away. i told you. do i was . interested in the piece because it away. i told you. do i was - interested in the piece because i love michael gridlock, my lithuanian bird clock as well. == i love michael gridlock, my lithuanian bird clock as well.— bird clock as well. -- i had to tell ou bird clock as well. -- i had to tell you about — bird clock as well. -- i had to tell you about the _ bird clock as well. -- i had to tell you about the piece _ bird clock as well. -- i had to tell you about the piece because - bird clock as well. -- i had to tell you about the piece because i - bird clock as well. -- i had to tell i you about the piece because i loved my little when in bird clock. they didn't p0p pop out, though, i have to say. do ou pop out, though, i have to say. do
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you think football is going to call time on var anytime soon? ila. you think football is going to call time on var anytime soon? no, no. but what you — time on var anytime soon? no, no. but what you need _ time on var anytime soon? no, no. but what you need is _ time on var anytime soon? no, no. but what you need is steam. - time on var anytime soon? no, no. but what you need is steam. steam | but what you need is steam. steam coming out of the use of the burnley players. they were furious that —— steam coming out of the ears of the burnley players. they felt that they should have got a late penalty, but the goal was allowed to stand. strong feelings. some really strong feelings on this one in a match that meant so much, because of burnley and luton's desperate fight to escape the relegation zone. the controversy surrounded luton's late equaliser, which the host felt should have been ruled out because of a foul. gavin ramjaun reports. a warm embrace on a cold night at turf moor. burnley blog may players were not in such a welcoming mood. they may have had one home when all season, but things were looking up shortly before the break. —— burnley�*s players were not in such a
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welcoming mood. relief for vincent kompany. frustration grew in the second half of luton. the search for an equaliser proved difficult. carlton morris of the bench and wealthy mark. but he would get a second chance to straight, spotted in the box, and rising highest to pull his side level and stoppage time. the only question now — what had var spotted? after a lengthy delay, the answer was nothing — no foul on goalkeeperjames trafford. luton leading lancashire on the coattails of the sides above them. burnley once again struggling for home comforts. gavin ramjaun, bbc news. now half of premier league teams are on a winter break this weekend, while the others get to put their feet up, next week including the likes of chelsea and fulham, who meet today. it's a case then of having the neighbours around, and both lost in their respective league cup semi final, first legs in the week, so this is a chance to bounce back in the heat of a local derby. it isa it is a special one, no doubts about it. you only have, 0k, in london,
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you have a big number of those, if you have a big number of those, if you could say it in this way, but yours have one or two more special for the fans. we play for the fans that we know it is important for them, certain types of games. this is one of those games. they are in a very good moment. they are performing well. they have very -ood are performing well. they have very good players. yes, we didn't perform bad - _ good players. yes, we didn't perform bad - badly, — good players. yes, we didn't perform bad — badly, neither. we came from a few victories — bad — badly, neither. we came from a few victories. we need to keep their belief _ few victories. we need to keep their belief i_ few victories. we need to keep their belief. i think the team is propelling well. i am so sure that we're _ propelling well. i am so sure that we're going to do a good job. after that, injury ravaged newcastle host manchester city in the late kick off. city are five points behind leaders liverpool but they have a game in hand. they'll be without erling haaland until the end of the month at least, but star man kevin de bruyne is back and available. it feels really good, dynamic, an emergency they were really good,
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better than the training sessions before the game. he was a little bit — a little bit not what he is, not as normal when he comes from the long injury. there was five months, i felt it was free but it was five. the recovery and so on, this is completely normal.— the team to their record has been incredible — the team to their record has been incredible in recent seasons and their_ incredible in recent seasons and their last — incredible in recent seasons and their last few seasons, they have sort of _ their last few seasons, they have sort of been in a similar pattern, really. _ sort of been in a similar pattern, really, whether they have just timed their run _ really, whether they have just timed their run. and then the second half of the _ their run. and then the second half of the season they've been very difficult — of the season they've been very difficult to play against once they have a _ difficult to play against once they have a target to go for. the runaway championship leaders leicester city make the short trip down the m69 to face coventry city this afternoon and can extend their lead at the top to 13 points with a win, before second—placed ipswich host sunderland this evening. while last night, some nifty footwork and dazzling finish from jonathan rowe helped norwich win at hull, which means they're nowjust a point behind hull, with both banging on the door
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of the play offs. now, in germany, bayern munich paid tribute to football hero franz beckenbauer in their first game since the legend passed away at the age of 78 on sunday, with the players warming up last night in beckenbauer�*s iconic number five shirt. and the players also wore black armbands during the game with hoffenheim last night, as they stood before to remember him. beckenbauer made over a00 appearances for bayern in the �*60s and �*70s. as for the match, harry kane — who else — scored again in a 3—0 win. his 30th goal of the season for both club and country in all competitions. and tributes were also paid last night, in the rugby union challenge cup match at 0spreys for welsh legend jpr williams, who also passed away this week. the welsh side paying their respects to the former wales and british and irish lions fullback at their match against perpignan in swansea.
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after the tributes and displays, 0spreys later beat perpignan to book a place in the last 16 of the competition, but newcastle are out, after losing to benetton. in the european champions cup, northampton made light work of bayonne in their pool match to continue their 100% record in the competition. saints ran amok in the first half and tom pearson completed his hat—trick after the break, winning 61—1a in the end at franklins gardens. now, a moment of perfection — which actually came from nowhere — helped mark allen come from a—1 down to eventually beat, mark selby and reach the semi—final of the snooker masters at alexandra palace. both players were making mistakes in a match that went past midnight, but was worth staying up for as allen hit a perfect 1a7 to help turn the match around. he said it was a special place to do it and will now face ali carter in the semis later today. this was after carter won a last—frame decider to beat judd trump 6—5. trump had threatened to take control
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before carter regained his composure to level at 5—5 and then take the decider. a huge win for him as he looks to improve on his best placing at the masters, and that was, what, runner—up, in 2020. we have more british european champions to toast at the european track cycling championships in the netherlands. emma finucane struck gold to became britain's first female european sprint champion — a repeat result of last year's world final. as reigning world and european champion, finucane will go into this summer's olympics in paris as the favourite in the women's sprint. and bigham beat charlie tanfield in an all—british men's individual pursuit final, winning by almost two seconds. the latest gold there, the latest golds took great britain's tally to three at the championships — the team pursuit gold on thursday. i told you about that yesterday. looking good. a real resurgence. really exciting at the moment. thank
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you so much, mike.— really exciting at the moment. thank you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now- — you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now. we _ you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now. we are _ you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now. we are back— you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now. we are back with - you so much, mike. thank you, mike. 6:32am now. we are back with the . 6:32am now. we are back with the headlines at seven o'clock. but dame judi dench has been talking about her greatest influence, william shakespeare. i've been invited to the home of one of our best—loved actors, a star of stage and screen for nearly seven decades, and a multiple bafta and oscar winner. damejudi dench has spent her career bringing to life a hugely diverse array of characters. i think you're a sexist, misogynist dinosaur. 0ops! indistinct chatter the glamour! laughter just behind us stands her academy award for a scene—stealing performance as elizabeth i in john madden's shakespeare in love. i know something of a woman in a man's profession. yes, by god, i do know about that. but her love for shakespeare began when she was a girl and led to her becoming one
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of the nation's greatest classical actors, a star of the national theatre, the old vic and the rsc. damned spot! out, i say! today i'm going to be hearing how shakespeare, or, asjudi calls him in the title of her new book, "the man who pays the rent," has remained centre—stage throughout her life. and the sun comes out... and the sun comes out. that's good. judi dench, welcome to this cultural life. thank you, john.
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you were born in 193a and grew up in york. set the scene for us. what was family life like? my father was a doctor... ..and i had two brothers, older than me. and of course, at that time, no television, nothing like that. so we all had bikes and we made our own entertainment. my second brother, jeff, only ever wanted to be an actor. my oldest brother wanted to be a doctor, like dad, and i wanted to be a designer, scenic designer. that's what i set out to be. from a young age? from quite a young age, because we were taken to the theatre a lot, you know, we were taken to... i remember once going to see a cuckoo in the nest, and i laughed so... this couple was in bed and suddenly a chest at the end of the bed opened and a man stood up in vest and pants. and i was sick. i laughed so much, i was sick. my mother had to take me home.
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but the wonderful thing is that i was taken back a couple of nights later to see what happened. laughter my pa used to be able to... he could recite the whole of hiawatha. and my... jeff, my brother, as i said, he wanted to be an actor, used to...he suddenly would launch into a huge, "for once upon a raw and gusty day, "the troubled tiber chafing with her shores; "caesar said to me, �*darest thou cassius, now, "�*leap in with me in to this angry flood "and swim to yonder point?”' and we'd go, "oh, jeff!" we'd be going... but it would go on for five minutes! jeff actually went to the rsc, didn't he? he certainly did. did he lead the way for you in that way? well, i expect he certainly did. but i was taken to stratford, by my parents again, in...in... ..in 1953, i think. and that would have been the very first shakespeare that you saw? no! oh, no. i'd seen shakespeare a long,
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long time ago, when my brother peter played duncan at st peter's school. macbeth. and i was taken... yeah. and he walked in and said, "what bloody man is that?" and i thought, "this is for me, this is absolutely for me." and then we went to stratford, when i was still bent on being a designer, and saw michael redgrave as lear. and it was the most incredible set, which was a great, huge, flat circle. and in the middle was a pile of stones which turned, so there could be a cave or a throne or anything else. so nobody had to come in with anything, and the action was completely continuous. and that's when something about designing shut down in me. ijust remember looking at this set and thinking, "never in my wildest dreams would i be able to think "of something like that." and you thought from that moment that acting, rather than designing, that's the road you wanted to take? well, i don't suppose i thought it as consciously as that. i don't suppose it was
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an overnight thing. i suppose it was a gradual thing. ithought, well, "i'll try and get to the central school, "like jeff." and i did. and so your father, medical man, interested in the theatre. were your parents involved in am—dram as well? yes, they were. the settlement players, they were part of. my ma used to make costumes and things. they decided to resurrect the miracle plays, the mystery plays in york. yes. so we were cast... can't believe it! ..as angels. six of us, i think, were angels in the first load of mystery plays. was that your first time onstage, then? no, because i played a snail. i played a...
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—— yes, just after i left central, just before i was going to the vic. and i knew that i'd been cast as 0phelia and i wasn't allowed to tell anybody. in hamlet, in 1957, at the old vic. do you have memories of yourfirst night, of opening night, in hamlet? fear. uh, no. i remember... ..memories of my second night, because the critics weren't kind to me! but what was so wonderful is that michael benthall, who ran the vic, said to me, "i'm going to keep "you in the company," he said. and he said, "you'll play other parts and you'll understudy "all the time and that way, you'll learn." what did you learn from that experience? you said that the critics were pretty harsh. they were, because they were very cross, that, you know, that the national had chosen somebody who wasn't known and a newcomer to play 0phelia. but i learned because it wasn't just six weeks, it was a year. so if you don't learn something in that time, you've had it, really. give up. as 0phelia descends into madness, she sings to herself, and although you're not known primarily as a singer, it was about ten years after you made your debut in hamlet that you were cast as sally bowles in the very first london production
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of cabaret, directed by hal prince. were you surprised to get that part? you bet i was surprised! i thought it was a joke. and i can remember going in and auditioning for him and singing from the wings, because i wouldn't come out onstage for a bit. but he lured me out. what were you singing? can you remember? i think i sang happy birthday to you. i just learned everything about how to kind of present myself in that musical. # hush up don't tell mama # shush up don't tell mama # don't tell mama, whatever you do # if you had a secret # you bet i could keep it # i would never tell on you... you took on many roles throughout the 1970s, and i think one of the greatest roles would have been in macbeth, with ian mckellen.
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at the other place, which was just a shed then. it's a theatre now, but it was just a shed. i always said that the sound was by god, because there was an enormous gust of wind under the door during the sleepwalking, and all i had was a candle. and the candle kind of would... it was very, very helpful! the candle did a lot of the acting for me during the sleepwalking. laughs here's the smell of the blood... ..still! all the perfumes of arabia will not sweeten this... ..little. .. ..hand.
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sobs, wheezes wails it was so exciting, though, because, you know, the audience was in there, as you are. mmm. so you had to be on the ball a bit. this is regarded as a landmark production now, directed by trevor nunn, and ian mckellen as macbeth. how much, when you when you take on a role like that, are you setting out to give a new fresh interpretation of lady macbeth? no, i think that would be fatal. you have to just think, "i'm going to play this "to the best of my ability, with the best of my "understanding," and of course, with trevor and with ian and with everybody else in the cast, it's like a recipe. it's not a single... it's not... you're not out on your own. i have given suck, and know how tender 'tis to love the babe that milks me — i would,
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while it was smiling in my face, have pluck'd my nipple from its boneless gums, and dash'd the brains out, had i so sworn as you have done to this. if we should fail? we fail! but screw your courage to the sticking—place, and we'll not fail. how were the rehearsals for that? very, very funny. and trevor would tell you this, but i remember once walking back with him from the other place, and we were very down about it. —— until the run starts? 0h, until the run finishes! really? you don't know it. there are people, i expect, who came to that who didn't
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like it very much. i mean, there might have been some people who came and said, "i couldn't see a thing." because it was so dark. if i went to that, i wouldn't be able to see at all. i'd be hopeless because i can't see anything now anyway! so it would be a disasterfor me. it's such an intimate space, so you must be really very vividly aware of reactions. you are. reactions to a very... and they're sitting where you are. right, yeah. because one night i was sitting, kneeling at ian's feet, and he said, you know, that line, "light thickens, "and the crow makes wing to the rooky wood." he said, "light thickens, and the crow makes wing "to the rooky nook." and... laughs i'm never very much in control of myself, but i laughed and laughed. i can remember thinking, "why not? "she's having hysteria at this time. "she's gone to pieces." so i had a bit of a laugh and fell over a bit. i was kneeling at his feet... "rooky nook" is very, very funny. did you cover it, then? do you think people...? no, i turned it into some kind of hysteria. shouldn't think i fooled pussy, i don't know. laughs but that must be very difficult, though. i mean, having that reaction and knowing that people are seeing every twitch of yourface, to playing
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at the 0livier or somewhere, a big space. it must change... it changes all the time. ..the performance. it changes all the time. because if you have a good night, it's completely fatal to think, the next night, think, "oh, i must do "it like that." no, no, no, it never works like that. you've got to rethink it, ithink. when we did antony and cleopatra at the national, we did 100 performances, and i knew that there was a laugh in a line that cleopatra said, and i tried, for 99 performances... ..to get the laugh. and on the 100th, i got the laugh. i'm going to come back to antony and cleopatra. you'd already played lady macbeth, hadn't you, i think 10, 12 years earlier in... africa. west africa. ..a tour of west african countries? yes. we did... where'd you go? ghana, sierra leone... ? ghana, sierra leone and nigeria. and we were the very, very first lot to go. and that was british council?
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british council. right. the british council said, would we go? because macbeth, twelfth night, and arms and the man were the set books for these young people, the children in nigeria, ghana, sierra leone. would we go and perform them? it was an experience i'll never, ever, everforget. ever. everything that rhymed made everybody laugh a lot. so "the thane of fife had a wife" used to bring the house down. absolutely... imean... oh, god. but that sort of performance, that sort of tour, taking it, as you say, to the people, i mean, it must give you a different insight into the power... of shakespeare. ..and the potential of shakespeare. you bet. nkrumah was a political prisoner at the time. we played in his...in the grounds of the palace for him.
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in ghana? yeah. so did that give...? that political undercurrent that was happening at the time... it was. ..did that give that play a different kind of meaning? well, it must have done to the... may... oh, well, must, may have done to the people watching. yeah. is that something that's important for you, in whichever decade that you're performing shakespeare, that it does...that it is malleable in a way, that it can be adapted for the times to reflect... well... ..the political mood ? ..i don't think it should be adapted. it's what it does to the person watching, isn't it? it's a reference, perhaps. but, i mean, you know, he knew... he knew absolutely everything, as far as i'm concerned, shakespeare, about every condition. and, therefore, that's why the plays have gone on for so long, because so many things mean different things to different people. and as well as that, all the emotions mean different things to people.
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mmm. and he was able to somehow say it in a way that we use today, colloquially. mmm. we don't know that we do it so often, i think. it's just occurred to me, i've said the word "macbeth" several times in your house. that's ok with you, is it? oh, yes. the next role that i'd like to talk about is another powerful, tragic woman — cleopatra in antony and cleopatra. and you played opposite anthony hopkins... idid. ..in a peter hall—directed production at the national theatre in 1987. i've read that you questioned peter hall's judgement when he cast you as cleopatra. idid. what was your worry? isaid, "well, you'll get a lot of laughs. "she's meant to be a very, very tall girl," i said. laughs queen of egypt. not quite right.
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what about her character? we talk about lady macbeth, very dark role there, she's a woman possessed. but cleopatra, you have that really amazing... she's a woman possessed. she's a woman who is passionate about her husband, and what he wants, she wants for him. that's what i think about lady macbeth. and similarly, cleopatra... ..is deeply in love as well, and driven by a great sense of sexual passion with antony. but she... i can remember peter saying to us, he said, "you get this great build—up about the two of them "at the very beginning of the play," which you do, i mean, they talk about... "and then in come two (bleep)," he said... ..said to us, "who behave very, very badly." and we used to roll all over the stage and be all over each other and behave extremely badly. because she's a comic and playful character in a way. there are so many different facets to her, the infinite variety. yes. infinite variety. well, more difficult to play. yes. difficult, that's what i'm trying to get at. difficult, certainly. and also because she's wilful, she's difficult, she's a real pain at times, isn't she? yeah. how much sympathy do you have to have for her? oh, you ask some
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very hard questions! i've suddenly remembered that you do. now, do you...? no, you just have to understand it and be able to make the audience understand. it's not... it's not a question of me having sympathy with it. it's a question of me showing the audience that that is the person. where is the fellow? half afeard to come. go to, go to. come hither, sir. good majesty, herod ofjewry dare not look upon you but when you are well pleased. that herod's head i'll have! but how, when antony is gone, through whom i might command it? there's gold for thee. tell me about working with anthony hopkins as antony. he was wonderful and very, very unexpected. you never knew which way he was going tojump. and that was important to that relationship between the two of them. mmm. but then, at his death,
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we were up at the monument and he would lie and he would die. and he would say to me, "and now you do act v and i'm "going to have a nice cup of tea." what, he would whisper that? and that's true. yes. really? "now i'll go and have a nice cup of tea while you do "act v, right?" was that the laughter that you were referring —— antony and cleopatra, in 1987, directed by peter hall, who was running the national theatre at the time, of course, wasn't he? so how would you characterise him as a director? oh, gosh, he used to stand at a lectern with the script, so that he would... and he would slightly beat it out so that you absolutely knew the rhythm that it should be. and i remember the death of cleopatra. "0ur royal lady's dead, dead, dead. "0ur royal lady's murdered." and he would... and we, the three of us, were there, one day,
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rehearsing, and it went on for a very long time. we got on to the last bit, that "royal lady's dead." there was a pause and peter said, "thank christ!" he said... laughs but it was just, you know, he was... a sticklerfor the meter, then? it's the rhythm of it. they're not written that way... ..for a wilful reason. they're written that way because you must... ..you must obey the rhythm of the line. it's like the beating of your heart. that's why i love it so much. tell me something about learning parts. cleopatra itself is a lot of lines to learn. was there a particular way of committing it to memory? did you have a particular method? no, it's just that it is the beating of your heart. it's... you know if you've missed something out because you hear that you missed it out. so that's very helpful. that rhythm? yes. the peter hall... that's right.
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"my father had a daughter loved a man, "as it might be, "were i a woman, i should your lordship." if you once kind of hear the rhythm of it, and if you obey it, it makes sense. if you go against it... ..it doesn't necessarily make sense. mmm. shakespeare hasn't ever really been a problem to me to learn. the last time you were onstage performing in a shakespeare play was the winter's tale in 2015, directed by kenneth branagh, which i guess was almost 60 years after your shakespearean debut when you played 0phelia in hamlet. and i said, "what was that like?" you said, "fear, fear." think back a few years to 2015. does experience...? what does experience do for first—night nerves? well, it doesn't do anything. you're still nervous. you still feel you have an enormous responsibility. but i suppose experience has taught me that there's more to worry about. everybody�*s nervous, and it's not yourjob
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to transmit it, nerves, to anybody, to your...the rest of the company, in any way. so just get on and do it properly, or better. and the next night, do it better than that. and kenneth branagh, onstage with you, playing... leontes. so how was it, being directed by your co—star? 0h, ken, i know him so well. when we did ghosts, first thing we did together... ibsen. we were sent out of the studio for laughing. that was mike gambon's fault. if you get on very well with somebody, you know, it's very easy because you can suddenly say, "i don't "understand this, but all right." you can, you know... and he has a wonderful sense of humour. god, it's important! what studied torments, tyrant, hast for me? what wheels, racks, fires? what flaying and boiling in leads and oils? what old or newer torture must i receive, whose every word deserves to hear of thy most worst? thy tyrannies, together working
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with thyjealousies — 0 think what they have done, and then run mad indeed, stark mad, for all thy bygone fooleries were but spices of it! it must have been quite challenging. i saw that performance that you gave in a winter's tale, and you were playing paulina, and also time. yes. time being the sort of...the kind of note to the audience that a lot of time has passed. yes, reminding you, in case you dropped off in the first... yes. "this is what's happened." what was known at the time was that your eyesight was degenerating, even then, and i remember seeing that performance and thinking, i mean, there's such a power and a clarity to your delivery, and a presence on the stage. was it... how difficult was it already, then, to be onstage? 0h, not that difficult because it was all flat. if there had been a flight of stairs, you might have had a different idea!
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i do a show with gyles brandreth, which we've been doing for a while, and he does a very kind thing. i've never actually said anything about it. but now, because he announces and i have to walk on, and he has a wonderful mat, which is kind of black—and—white, looks like a huge zebra lying on the ground. but, you know, i make... i'm like a plane coming in to land. i make for the mat. i can see that. x marks the spot. there's the mat. now i know i'm in safe ground. for those who don't know, it's macular degeneration, isn't it? yeah. my mother had it. mm. it's all right. i can't seem to read any more, so that's tricky because i have to learn... anything i have to learn now is tricky. mmm. i will think up a new way of doing it. so, how do you learn the lines now, then? do you get somebody to read them out to you?
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well, i haven't had to do it since my eyes have been this bad. but i will. i'll try... i'll find a way. what's the big part coming up, then? do you think that... ..that performance in the winter's tale, do you think that is possibly the last time we'll see you in shakespeare, onstage? oh, god, iwouldn't like to think that. probably is, but i'm not going to say that. you never know, do you? i've never been in 0thello. that would have been nice at some point. which of the many roles that you've played over the years, the shakespearean roles i'm talking about, when were you happiest onstage doing shakespeare? there must be a moment... i've never not been. really? never not been. i mean, there are plays you like more. well, there's going to be... there must be some plays that you don't particularly like. i don't like the merchant of venice as a play. and michael and i, when we were first married at stratford, he played bassanio, and i played portia. i didn't like that. i still don't like that play. mmm. they all behave so badly, and there's not much excuse
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for any of them. when you were young actors starting out, you and your late husband michael williams used to refer to shakespeare as "the man who pays the rent". yes, we called him that. michael was in one company, i was in the other, and shakespeare was the person who we were playing all the time. and so he was very much the man who paid the rent. what is he now to you? the man who pays the rent, probably. laughter well, he certainly... he's never been less than that. very, very, very important. he's referred to every day in my life, i think, probably, and i think he's referred to in most of our days, without us knowing. yeah, absolutely. heaven. judi dench, thank you so much for sharing your cultural life with us. not very cultural! thank you, john. quite a life, though. thank you.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: the united states launches a new overnight strike against houthi rebels in yemen, a day after the us and the uk bombed targets in nearly 30 locations. it comes after weeks of attacks by the rebels on cargo ships in the red sea, which is key
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for international trading routes. finance experts say the post office may have underpaid more than £100 million in tax while overpaying top executives. good morning. "ridiculous and disgraceful", how burnley�*s co—owner described luton's late equaliser in their relegation battle last night, which was allowed to stand, by var despite what they claim was a blatant foul on their keeper. morning, all. it's a rather quiet start to our weekend. we'll be chasing cloud amounts around to begin with and they'll linger across england and wales. but more sunshine coming through for scotland and northern ireland, but it will start to feel colder, particularly for the second half of the weekend. i'll have all the details on that coming up shortly. good morning. it's saturday, 13th january. our main story: the united states has confirmed it's carried out a fresh strike on a houthi target in yemen overnight, a day after both the us and uk carried out a series of raids on the iran—backed group.
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the operation follows attacks by houthi rebels on shipping vessels in the red sea. the group has said the strikes in yemen will not go without "punishment or retaliation". graham satchell reports. before and after — satellite images show the impact of the american and british bombing raids. the americans say airfields and weapons storage depots were destroyed. the raf didn't take part in the attack overnight, but both the british and americans say the raids are vital to keep shipping routes open in the red sea. houthi militia have been targeting container ships off the yemeni coast for weeks. sometimes, like this, they have boarded vessels. in other attacks, they used drones and missiles. they say they are disrupting this key shipping route to show their support for palestinians in gaza.
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yemen sits at a key strategic position in the middle east, especially for global shipping. the normal route from the far east goes around the coast of yemen, through the red sea and the suez canal. he it has been significantly disrupted. most vessels are now taking the longer route around southern africa. it means delay and extra cost to global commerce. a huge rally in the yemeni capital, sana'a. protesters burned the american and israeli flags. millions in yemen and across the arab world are appalled by israel's conduct of the war in gaza, and they see the current air strikes by the west as an escalation. a houthi military spokesman said british and american criminal aggression would not go unanswered or unpunished. the americans maintain air strikes are a proportionate response, and they're talking down a wider conflict. we absolutely do not
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want to see an extension of the conflict in gaza broader into the region and will continue to work hard on that. but at the same time, we can't allow the houthis to continue to conduct these attacks, putting innocent mariners' lives at risk and affecting the global economy. the houthis are backed but not controlled by iran. the clear worry now is that what's happening in gaza and the red sea spreads and escalates to the wider region. graham satchell, bbc news. hugo bachega. 0ur middle east correspondent hugo bachega is in beirut this morning. good morning to you. we have had another strike by the united states and the reactions have been coming through internationally. yes.
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and the reactions have been coming through internationally.— through internationally. yes, good mornin: . through internationally. yes, good morning- this— through internationally. yes, good morning. this latest _ through internationally. yes, good morning. this latest attack- through internationally. yes, good morning. this latest attack was . morning. this latest attack was carried out by a us naval ship in the region and tomahawk cruise missiles were used in this latest attack. and obviously this happened after the first wave of attacks carried out by the americans, with the help of uk forces, and we haven't had confirmation about the location hit, but reports suggest that the capital, sonata, was hit, the americans are saying that a reader used by the houthis was the target so this was a smaller and more targeted attack that have been carried out by the americans. 0bviously carried out by the americans. obviously this operation here is aimed at degrading the ability of the houthis to carry out those attacks targeting shipping vessels in the red sea and we have seen that these attacks have caused a lot of disruption to global trade and there have been concerns about the
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possible economic impact that these attacks could have. now, last night, president biden warned that the us could act again against the houthis if those attacks didn't stop. he said those attacks were outrageous. and there has been reaction from the houthis, they have promised to carry out a very strong response, a response that would be felt by american and british citizens. but so far this response has been muted. hugo, for the moment, thanks very much. hugo bachega therefore is in beirut. it is 7:06am. there has been enquiry into the post office horizon it scandal, but now there are questions about how it was coming through. this there are questions about how it was coming through-— coming through. this is related to tax and how— coming through. this is related to tax and how much _ coming through. this is related to tax and how much tax _ coming through. this is related to tax and how much tax has - coming through. this is related to i tax and how much tax has been paid. let's take you through what we have been hearing. the post office may have underpaid
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more than £100 million in tax while overpaying its senior executives. that's according to experts, the tax policy associates, who say the post office paid less tax by deducting payments to victims of the horizon it scandal from its profits. they say this could be a possible breach of tax law. here's our business editor simonjack to explain. what they have been doing is deducting compensation due to victims of the scandal from their reported profits, thereby lowering — in some cases wiping out — their tax bill. now, tax experts have told us that may be a breach of tax law, that you are not normally allowed to deduct fines or compensation for unlawful acts from your profits, they're non—tax—deductible, and as a result the post office may owe over £100 million in unpaid tax. now, in effect the government willjust have to step in and support it as it has in the past. but there is another dimension to this, whereas they have included those payments out when it comes to reporting profits, they've stripped them out when it comes to executive pay and bonuses, ignoring those payments, which means they �*ve been boosting
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the salary and the bonuses of those executives. now, leading tax lawyer dan neidle, said to me, he's from tax policy associates, if a public company had done this, or a private plc had done this, then the shareholders would be asking for the heads of their senior executives on a platter. simon jack reporting there. meanwhile, the minister responsible for the post office, kevin hollinrake, says he wants people to be jailed over the horizon it scandal. we're joined now by our political correspondent peter saull. good morning to you. this story has been so across the headlines this week, with human stories, details of what's been happening, what is the government minister said? more strong language _ government minister said? more strong language from _ government minister said? more strong language from kevin - strong language from kevin hollinrake, the nistor at the heart of the government's response to all
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of the government's response to all of this this week, was on radio a's emma kenny questions this week, asked about the possibility of criminal prosecutions for those responsible for the scandal. remember, ultimately this is a matter for the courts. remember, ultimately this is a matterfor the courts. he remember, ultimately this is a matter for the courts. he said yes, because they should be held to account. asked whether individual, senior should be jailed, account. asked whether individual, seniorshould be jailed, he account. asked whether individual, senior should be jailed, he said absolutely yes, this should be the ultimate deterrent, well aware, kevin hollinrake, of the public backlash to this, millions of people watching the itv drama which is mr writer the top of the political agenda. the government has also announced this week blanket legislation that will ultimately exonerate all of the supposed masters and mistresses who have been wrongly convicted, that process they hope will be concluded by the end of the year. the other thing the government is looking at is whether or not the post office to be able to about private prosecutions in the future. kevin hollinrake said on that he didn't think there was a chance in hell, really, that happening in the future. again, quite a complex issue, justice
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secretary alex chalk has been given this a look at in the round. there are other organisations that could bring about private prosecutions. i think that will take some time. the enui think that will take some time. the enquiry carries on, we know that, a lengthy process. the whole principle is to learn lessons, isn't it, that's the ultimate objective, now we have the tuc asking questions about whether enough has been learned, as we speak now, in terms of the daily operations. yes. learned, as we speak now, in terms of the daily operations.— of the daily operations. yes, what the tuc is — of the daily operations. yes, what the tuc is talking _ of the daily operations. yes, what the tuc is talking about _ of the daily operations. yes, what the tuc is talking about is - of the daily operations. yes, what the tuc is talking about is the - the tuc is talking about is the process of awarding public contracts to private companies. of course, in this instance it was fujitsu who provided the horizon it system for the post office and a piece of legislation passed last year, the procurement act, the government is saying this is all about improving accountability of private companies to get contracts, the tuc�* big gaps in them what they were calling for, for example, was the idea that journalists, individuals, could put
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in freedom of information requests to private companies that are awarded public contract, that was not ultimately included in the legislation and they said that had it been then the raizen scandal might have come to light a lot earlier need to look again at that legislation, with the government saying they do now have stronger powers to intervene when private companies are awarded public contracts. companies are awarded public contracts-— companies are awarded public contracts. ., ., contracts. peter, for the moment, thank you- — donald trump has been ordered to pay the new york times more than £300,000 for a failed lawsuit after accusing the newspaper of "an insidious plot" to obtain his tax records. mr trump's case was dismissed last year and on friday he was ordered to repay the publication's legal fees. the series of articles on the former president's financial affairs won a pulitzer prize. the rate of deforestation in the amazon rainforest halved in 2023, falling to its lowest level in five years. it is home to around three million species of plants and animals and is said to be crucial in the fight against climate change. brazil's president has pledged
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to end deforestation by 2030. people in taiwan are voting for a new president today in elections seen as a core test of the island's relationship with china. the territory rules itself but is claimed by mainland china. 0ur reporter shaimaa khalil in the taiwanese capital of taipei. a very good morning to you. i am assuming, is that one of the polling booths i can see behind you, because voting is under way. yes. booths i can see behind you, because voting is under way.— voting is under way. yes. yes, can ou see voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? — voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? it— voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? it is _ voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? it is a _ voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? it is a lovely _ voting is under way. yes. yes, can you see it? it is a lovely temple i you see it? it is a lovely temple thatis you see it? it is a lovely temple that is a polling station today and obviously many things have been turned into polling stations, schools, churches, gyms, we arejust outside this temple, a steady flow with less than an hour to go before the polling stations close and the counting begins. this is a highly consequential election. i have
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insigne described as the big deal, the big one, because at the heart of this is that tussle for regional influence between the united states and china and, of course, taiwan is in the middle of it. china claims taiwan as its own, the us has been a strong ally of the self—governing island for years now, and it sees it as a partner to counter china's influence and assertiveness in the region. the dt —— dpp, the ruling party, are looking for a record third term in office will if that happens we can see a continuation of the policy, self—governing stance, away from china's orbit, away from the united states, that is likely to anger beijing, we will for a reaction, the opposition kmt are offering dialogue with beijing, better ties with beijing. and there is a third party, the dye wants people —— the taiwan people's party, which has inspired young people. generally people have spoken to worried about the economy, housing,
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employment, the back of their mind is the cross street attention and the threat from china. this is an important election happening against a very dense geopolitical backdrop. —— cross strait. a very dense geopolitical backdrop. -- cross strait.— there's been a huge rise in the amount of money stolen by scammers advertising fake jobs. according to action fraud, con artists send out text and whatsapp messages to people, offering them roles with a high wage and then trick them into handing over banking and card details. dan whitworth from radio a's money box has more. like many frauds, this is a numbers game, millions of scam messages get sent out and most are ignored. but itjust takes one to hit the right person at the right time — someone looking for a job or wanting to earn more money — for criminals to seize their opportunity. bella was caught out after she lost herjob and had boasted a cv online, and after dozens of follow—up messages and phone calls over several days, she had £3000 stolen. i didn't know if i could stop them, if there was a way of sorting out,
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i had no idea how they'd left my account, really — just couldn't draw the two together. it was, yeah, three months�* worth of work, two and a half months, the whole summer, 50—55 hour weeks, so i was pretty distraught and upset. last year, 126 people contacted action fraud to report being caught by this scam. nearly £1 million were stolen, 50 times as much as the year before. city of london police, the national lead for fraud, says these numbers are likely to be the tip of the iceberg as most victims don't report fraud because of feelings of embarrassment and shame. people on the outside that aren't looking forjobs, that aren't motivated respond, sometimes they don't understand how people become victim of this type of crime, but, really, when we think about it, if you are concerned about a message or you think that there are alarm bells going up, that fraud is not going to get you. the fraud that gets you is the fraud that makes sense, and that's
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what these criminals do so well. if you get one of these messages the advice is to ignore it, report it, you can forward scam texts 7726 and then delete it. dan whitworth, bbc news. scripts from two episodes of friends that were found in a bin have sold for £22,000 at auction. i, ross... ..take thee, emily... ..take thee, rachel... the drafts were for the season four finale, set in the uk in 1998, and were discovered by a staff member at fountain studios, where the episodes were filmed. that is the one where ross gets the name wrong at the wedding. i that is the one where ross gets the name wrong at the wedding.- name wrong at the wedding. i can't believe you — name wrong at the wedding. i can't believe you don't _ name wrong at the wedding. i can't believe you don't remember- name wrong at the wedding. i can't believe you don't remember it. - name wrong at the wedding. i can't believe you don't remember it. the second time _ believe you don't remember it. ii2 second time i've seen it, now it is starting to ring a bell. it is
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second time i've seen it, now it is starting to ring a bell.— starting to ring a bell. it is like one of the _ starting to ring a bell. it is like one of the moments. - starting to ring a bell. it is like one of the moments. it - starting to ring a bell. it is like one of the moments. it led - starting to ring a bell. it is like one of the moments. it led to| starting to ring a bell. it is like - one of the moments. it led to some torture at episodes is that the one called the when where... they are all called the when where... there are quite a lot of eisodes where... there are quite a lot of episodes like _ where... there are quite a lot of episodes like that _ where... there are quite a lot of episodes like that with _ where... there are quite a lot of episodes like that with ross. - where... there are quite a lot of i episodes like that with ross. what is the one today? _ episodes like that with ross. what is the one today? the _ episodes like that with ross. what is the one today? the one - episodes like that with ross. “iii“isgt is the one today? the one where louise tells you how cold it is going to get? it louise tells you how cold it is going to get?— louise tells you how cold it is auoin to et? , ., going to get? it is the one where eve bod going to get? it is the one where everybody is _ going to get? it is the one where everybody is wanting _ going to get? it is the one where everybody is wanting to - going to get? it is the one where everybody is wanting to know - going to get? it is the one where| everybody is wanting to know will going to get? it is the one where - everybody is wanting to know will we have snow _ everybody is wanting to know will we have snow where i live, and it is always _ have snow where i live, and it is always a — have snow where i live, and it is always a tricky one at this time of year _ always a tricky one at this time of year i_ always a tricky one at this time of year i am — always a tricky one at this time of year. i am very certain it will get bitterly— year. i am very certain it will get bitterly cold as we go through the week— bitterly cold as we go through the week ahead. next week, colder, with the risk— week ahead. next week, colder, with the risk of— week ahead. next week, colder, with the risk of snow showers in the zero that could _ the risk of snow showers in the zero that could cause some disruption. for all— that could cause some disruption. for all of— that could cause some disruption. for all of us— that could cause some disruption. for all of us were likely to see some — for all of us were likely to see some severe night—time frost as temperatures fall way below freezing some places. the reason for this
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change _ some places. the reason for this change is — some places. the reason for this change is this series of fronts that are skirting — change is this series of fronts that are skirting their way south through the weekend. they are going to allow this cold _ the weekend. they are going to allow this cold arctic air to plunge down next week, — this cold arctic air to plunge down next week, right across the country. you will really notice the difference. not quite as cold today. you have _ difference. not quite as cold today. you have this first cold front, sitting — you have this first cold front, sitting through northern ireland, northern— sitting through northern ireland, northern england got nothing on it, the odd _ northern england got nothing on it, the odd spot of light drizzle, which will sink— the odd spot of light drizzle, which will sink sell. a lot of cloud over england — will sink sell. a lot of cloud over england and wales. the best of the brightness goes into the east of the pennines. _ brightness goes into the east of the pennines, across scotland. if you .et pennines, across scotland. if you get it _ pennines, across scotland. if you get it showers of rain to the north—west of the grey plan. generally, further south, 5—8. not as cold _ generally, further south, 5—8. not as cold as — generally, further south, 5—8. not as cold as it— generally, further south, 5—8. not as cold as it has been, but cold air will arrive — as cold as it has been, but cold air will arrive as — as cold as it has been, but cold air will arrive as we go through the second — will arrive as we go through the second half of the weekend. into saturday — second half of the weekend. into saturday and sunday, the next front pushes _ saturday and sunday, the next front pushes deadly cell. a few nuisance showers _ pushes deadly cell. a few nuisance showers on — pushes deadly cell. a few nuisance showers on it overnight across england — showers on it overnight across england and wales. some rain. icy patches _ england and wales. some rain. icy patches first thing in the morning.
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a sunny— patches first thing in the morning. a sunny start it scotland. through the days _ a sunny start it scotland. through the days when we are likely to see some _ the days when we are likely to see some showers, and these will contain some _ some showers, and these will contain some sleet _ some showers, and these will contain some sleet and snow even at lower levels _ some sleet and snow even at lower levels and — some sleet and snow even at lower levels and sunday. the cold air arriving — levels and sunday. the cold air arriving here. further south, chasing _ arriving here. further south, chasing cloud around sunny spells, and still— chasing cloud around sunny spells, and still not as cold, 5—7 across and _ and still not as cold, 5—7 across and wales, _ and still not as cold, 5—7 across and wales, 3— four in scotland. these _ and wales, 3— four in scotland. these no—shows are likely to continue _ these no—shows are likely to continue into monday. wintry snow showers _ continue into monday. wintry snow showers into northern ireland as well, _ showers into northern ireland as well, rain. — showers into northern ireland as well, rain, sleet, and snow. drain settled _ well, rain, sleet, and snow. drain settled elsewhere. monday and tuesday, this waterfront could enhance — tuesday, this waterfront could enhance showers across northern ireland _ enhance showers across northern ireland and northern england for a time _ ireland and northern england for a time. scotland, northern ireland, northern— time. scotland, northern ireland, northern england, rain, sleet, and snow _ northern england, rain, sleet, and snow could — northern england, rain, sleet, and snow. could be snow in scotland. this could — snow. could be snow in scotland. this could be ten centimetres starting — this could be ten centimetres starting to accumulate here. that could _ starting to accumulate here. that could cause some disruption. the rest of— could cause some disruption. the rest of england and wales will be dry and _ rest of england and wales will be dry and sunny, but colder for or with— dry and sunny, but colder for or with a _ dry and sunny, but colder for or with a maximum of around 2—a, dry and sunny, but colder for or with a maximum of around 2—a , and that will—
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with a maximum of around 2—a , and that will feel — with a maximum of around 2—a , and that will feel really chilly indeed. this no— that will feel really chilly indeed. this no emphasis really as we go through— this no emphasis really as we go through tuesday will be across scotland, northern ireland, and northern— scotland, northern ireland, and northern england. this area of low pressure _ northern england. this area of low pressure we were concerned might bring _ pressure we were concerned might bring some — pressure we were concerned might bring some snow across southern england _ bring some snow across southern england into wednesday. at the moment, — england into wednesday. at the moment, though, now, it looks like it will— moment, though, now, it looks like it will push— moment, though, now, it looks like it will push steadily south and east and continue across france. at the moment— and continue across france. at the moment it — and continue across france. at the moment it looks likely england and wales— moment it looks likely england and wales on— moment it looks likely england and wales on wednesday will mist the snow, _ wales on wednesday will mist the snow. but — wales on wednesday will mist the snow, but keep watching the forecast, _ snow, but keep watching the forecast, because it is still a long way away~ — forecast, because it is still a long way away. back to you two. thank you louise. way away. back to you two. thank you louise- see — way away. back to you two. thank you louise- see you _ way away. back to you two. thank you louise. see you soon. _ it is 7:21am and ten people in the uk -- it is 7:21am and ten people in the uk —— and one in ten people in the uk —— and one in ten people in the uk sufferfrom eczema. the condition can be excruciating and debilitating — and can leave the skin itchy, red and sore. but now scientists have discovered a new type of bacteria that triggers skin irritation, and it's hoped this can pave the way for more treatment options in the future. we“re joined now by brittany parr,
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who“s had the condition since she was 11. good morning and thank you for joining us, brittany. iwould just ask our viewers, too, if you have any stress with this, get in touch as well, because we“ll any stress with this, get in touch as well, because we'll be speaking to an expert later on in the programme, talking about their experience and that's getting some advice. how long have you had eczema, brittany?— advice. how long have you had eczema, brittany? since i was about 11. how eczema, brittany? since i was about 11- how does — eczema, brittany? since i was about 11- how does it _ eczema, brittany? since i was about 11. how does it emanate? _ eczema, brittany? since i was about 11. how does it emanate? how- eczema, brittany? since i was about 11. how does it emanate? how does| eczema, brittany? since i was about i 11. how does it emanate? how does it a- ear on 11. how does it emanate? how does it appear on your _ 11. how does it emanate? how does it appear on your skin? _ 11. how does it emanate? how does it appear on your skin? when _ 11. how does it emanate? how does it appear on your skin? when i - 11. how does it emanate? how does it appear on your skin? when i first - appear on your skin? when i first ot it, it appear on your skin? when i first got it. it was _ appear on your skin? when i first got it, it was first _ appear on your skin? when i first got it, it was first on _ appear on your skin? when i first got it, it was first on my - appear on your skin? when i first got it, it was first on my knees i appear on your skin? when i first i got it, it was first on my knees and legs, _ got it, it was first on my knees and legs, not— got it, it was first on my knees and legs, not too— got it, it was first on my knees and legs, not too bad, just very minimai _ legs, not too bad, just very minimal. and so... legs, not too bad, “ust very minimal. and so. . .j- legs, not too bad, “ust very minimal. and so... and it's it she? it was minimal. and so... and it's it she? it wasjust — minimal. and so... and it's it she? it wasjust patching _ minimal. and so... and it's it she? it wasjust patching them - minimal. and so... and it's it she? it wasjust patching them on - minimal. and so... and it's it she? it wasjust patching them on my i minimal. and so... and it's it she? i it wasjust patching them on my legs were just _ it wasjust patching them on my legs were just patchy. no irritation or anything. — were just patchy. no irritation or anything, just you could tell i had it, anything, just you could tell i had it. but— anything, just you could tell i had it. but it — anything, just you could tell i had it, but it wasjust like rough areas on my— it, but it wasjust like rough areas on my skin — it, but it was “ust like rough areas on my skin.— it, but it was “ust like rough areas on m skin. . i. . , on my skin. ok. when you had theirs, what sort of — on my skin. ok. when you had theirs, what sort of treatment, _ on my skin. ok. when you had theirs, what sort of treatment, if _ on my skin. ok. when you had theirs, what sort of treatment, if you - on my skin. ok. when you had theirs, what sort of treatment, if you ask - what sort of treatment, if you ask for any treatment, if it wasn't edgy. for any treatment, if it wasn't edgy, what was the issue with it that you felt, 0k, edgy, what was the issue with it that you felt, ok, i want to get rid
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of this now? == that you felt, ok, i want to get rid of this now?— that you felt, ok, i want to get rid of this now? -- this. it was more in my teenage — of this now? -- this. it was more in my teenage years — of this now? -- this. it was more in my teenage years where _ of this now? -- this. it was more in my teenage years where it - of this now? -- this. it was more in my teenage years where it started i my teenage years where it started causing _ my teenage years where it started causing problems, started getting worse _ causing problems, started getting worse and i started getting it on my elbows _ worse and i started getting it on my elbows i_ worse and i started getting it on my elbows. i went back and forth to doctors — elbows. ! went back and forth to doctors to— elbows. i went back and forth to doctors to try to get prescribed medications to try to help my flareups— medications to try to help my flareups with my eczema. what do you think causes — flareups with my eczema. what do you think causes more _ flareups with my eczema. what do you think causes more flareups? _ flareups with my eczema. what do you think causes more flareups? is - flareups with my eczema. what do you think causes more flareups? is it - think causes more flareups? is it stress—related, for example? i think causes more flareups? is it stress-related, for example? i don't think mine was _ stress-related, for example? i don't think mine was related _ stress-related, for example? i don't think mine was related to _ stress-related, for example? i don't think mine was related to stress. - stress-related, for example? i don't think mine was related to stress. i i think mine was related to stress. i know— think mine was related to stress. i know there — think mine was related to stress. i know there are different things that can cause _ know there are different things that can cause a — know there are different things that can cause a flareup like different foods— can cause a flareup like different foods and — can cause a flareup like different foods and stress. my worst flareups were after _ foods and stress. my worst flareups were after my pregnancies with my two daughters. it could be to do with my— two daughters. it could be to do with my hormones, because that is the only— with my hormones, because that is the only change i have had, in that period _ the only change i have had, in that period of— the only change i have had, in that period of time. lots the only change i have had, in that period of time.— period of time. lots of people live with eczema _ period of time. lots of people live with eczema and _ period of time. lots of people live with eczema and it _ period of time. lots of people live with eczema and it can _ period of time. lots of people live with eczema and it can emanate i period of time. lots of people live | with eczema and it can emanate in very different ways. what have you done, personally, to try to find ways to ease the symptoms? shifter
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ways to ease the symptoms? after auoin back ways to ease the symptoms? after going back and _ ways to ease the symptoms? after going back and forth _ ways to ease the symptoms? after going back and forth to _ ways to ease the symptoms? after going back and forth to doctors, i did a _ going back and forth to doctors, i did a little — going back and forth to doctors, i did a little bit of research myself at home — did a little bit of research myself at home to see what was out there that i_ at home to see what was out there that i could — at home to see what was out there that i could use that wasn't so harmful, — that i could use that wasn't so harmful, because i know a lot of stuff— harmful, because i know a lot of stuff that— harmful, because i know a lot of stuff that doctors prescribe have a lot of— stuff that doctors prescribe have a lot of chemicals in them. sol stuff that doctors prescribe have a lot of chemicals in them. so ijust looked _ lot of chemicals in them. so ijust looked online to see what was the best option, really. did looked online to see what was the best option, really.— best option, really. did you feel secure doing — best option, really. did you feel secure doing that _ best option, really. did you feel secure doing that because - best option, really. did you feel secure doing that because back| best option, really. did you feel i secure doing that because back as you well know and you would have seen a breakfast, you can get all sorts of things online, which claimed to be able to be cures for something and aunt, aren“t claimed to be able to be cures for something and aunt, aren't they? it is a bit of a minefield out there. i basically look for reviews and tried to find _ basically look for reviews and tried to find what was best, because you can obviously get — they can set works— can obviously get — they can set works but — can obviously get — they can set works but it doesn't, but luckily i found _ works but it doesn't, but luckily i found something which dead. one of the studies published _ found something which dead. one of the studies published has _ found something which dead. one of the studies published has found - found something which dead. ©“i2 ii the studies published has found that donkey milk, for example, has something in it which helps repair. you not because you had experience in april,
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which we don't need to name, which has similar ingredients. yes. which we don't need to name, which has similar ingredients.— has similar ingredients. yes, so it has similar ingredients. yes, so it has turmeric _ has similar ingredients. yes, so it has turmeric and _ has similar ingredients. yes, so it has turmeric and donkey - has similar ingredients. yes, so it has turmeric and donkey milk - has similar ingredients. yes, so it has turmeric and donkey milk and j has similar ingredients. yes, so it - has turmeric and donkey milk and you can find _ has turmeric and donkey milk and you can find them in — we find them on supplements you can take, but you never _ supplements you can take, but you never find — supplements you can take, but you never find - — supplements you can take, but you never find — you never think about putting _ never find — you never think about putting in— never find — you never think about putting in a — never find — you never think about putting in a cream to use in your skin _ putting in a cream to use in your skin. ~ ., putting in a cream to use in your skin. . . ., ,., putting in a cream to use in your skin. . . ., ., . skin. what would you say to anyone suffering with _ skin. what would you say to anyone suffering with eczema _ skin. what would you say to anyone suffering with eczema at _ skin. what would you say to anyone suffering with eczema at the - skin. what would you say to anyone i suffering with eczema at the moment? whether it be free this new scientific research? i whether it be free this new scientific research?- whether it be free this new scientific research? i would deftly sa do scientific research? i would deftly say do your _ scientific research? i would deftly say do your research, _ scientific research? i would deftly say do your research, look- scientific research? i would deftly say do your research, look into i scientific research? i would deftly| say do your research, look into it, and try— say do your research, look into it, and try to — say do your research, look into it, and try to find what triggers your three _ and try to find what triggers your three or— and try to find what triggers your three or your eczema. and try to find what triggers your three oryour eczema. —— and try to find what triggers your three or your eczema. —— definitely. and definitely look for more natural ingredients and donkey milk worked .reat ingredients and donkey milk worked great for— ingredients and donkey milk worked great for me. if you find something with donkeys milk in it, give it a lo. with donkeys milk in it, give it a .o_ , , with donkeys milk in it, give it a io. , , . , go. this is it. just giving everything _ go. this is it. just giving everything a go, - go. this is it. just giving everything a go, withinl go. this is it. just giving - everything a go, within reason. thank you so much, brittany. brittany sharing her experiences as a sufferer of eczema. perhaps you would like to share yours as well,
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or may be looking after a child with the condition. with this new research, harvard have found that there is a bacteria that triggers, they think that it triggers the irritation. perhaps working on that bacteria specifically might help. we will get more scientific detail with a consultant dermatologist later. but you can contact us on whatsapp. there is a number — 0330123 0&40. there is a number — 0330123 01140. 9:15am is and will speak to the professor. we will look at some of your questions. ——is when we will speak. we will try to get some answers with you. find speak. we will try to get some answers with you.— speak. we will try to get some answers with you. and where you live. we would _ answers with you. and where you live. we would like _ answers with you. and where you live. we would like to _ say so—and—so from so—and—so. it is 7:25am. drag fans from around the world are gathering in london today for what ru paul is calling the "most inclusive party on earth" — a big claim.
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it's the third annual uk drag con. celebrating all things drag culture, around 180 queens will sashay down the pink carpet for the official opening of the event this morning, and our lgbt and identity reporter josh parry is there on the pink carpet for us. good morning. ifeelvery good morning. i feel very at home here _ good morning. i feel very at home here i_ good morning. i feel very at home here i don't— good morning. i feel very at home here. i don't want to get to it because _ here. i don't want to get to it because in_ here. i don't want to get to it because in a couple of hours there will be _ because in a couple of hours there will be 180 — more than 180 drag queens _ will be 180 — more than 180 drag queens stomping up and down here, showing _ queens stomping up and down here, showing off their outfits that make up showing off their outfits that make up their_ showing off their outfits that make up theirwings and showing off their outfits that make up their wings and all of that. because — up their wings and all of that. because it is the biggest celebration of drag in the uk, drag con. _ celebration of drag in the uk, drag con. the _ celebration of drag in the uk, drag con, the official party for fans of ru paul's— con, the official party for fans of ru paul's drag race which catapulted dra- ru paul's drag race which catapulted drag into— ru paul's drag race which catapulted drag into the mainstream. there are different_ drag into the mainstream. there are different international franchises. today _ different international franchises. today fans can come down to the xl london _ today fans can come down to the xl london to— today fans can come down to the xl london to meet their favourite queens — london to meet their favourite queens in _ london to meet their favourite queens. in a couple of hours, this place will— queens. in a couple of hours, this place will be full of thousands of fans having fun and meeting their
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favourite — fans having fun and meeting their favourite queens.— fans having fun and meeting their favourite queens. can't wait. thank ou josh. favourite queens. can't wait. thank you josh- we _ favourite queens. can't wait. thank you josh- we can't _ favourite queens. can't wait. thank you josh. we can't wait. _ you josh. we can't wait. see you later. donald trump has appeared in court twice this week, but this does not appear to be doing him much harm in the polls. three days out from the opening primary in iowa and he is still 30 points ahead. meanwhile, president biden is casting this year's likely rematch for the white house, as a battle to save us democracy. ros atkins has been taking a look. the us election is in november and president biden has this warning. donald trump campaign is obsessed with the past, not the future. he is willing to sacrifice our democracy. put himself in power.— willing to sacrifice our democracy. put himself in power. donald trump is favoured to _ put himself in power. donald trump is favoured to be _ put himself in power. donald trump is favoured to be the _ put himself in power. donald trump is favoured to be the republican - is favoured to be the republican presidential nominee and he is firing joe biden's accusation back at him. ., ., ., , , ., at him. now, we have a president who is a ureat at him. now, we have a president who is a great danger _ at him. now, we have a president who is a great danger to _ at him. now, we have a president who is a great danger to democracy. - at him. now, we have a president who is a great danger to democracy. he - is a great danger to democracy. he really is. he is a danger to democracy and at a level that few people have seen.— democracy and at a level that few people have seen. donald trump has
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not provided — people have seen. donald trump has not provided convincing _ people have seen. donald trump has not provided convincing evidence - people have seen. donald trump has not provided convincing evidence to i not provided convincing evidence to support the claim but his own actions raise questions about his impact on us democracy. not least his false claim that the 2020 election was stolen from them, a claim we had the day after voting finished. . . claim we had the day after voting finished. , , .. , ., finished. this is the case without t in: to finished. this is the case without trying to steal— finished. this is the case without trying to steal an _ finished. this is the case without trying to steal an election, - finished. this is the case without trying to steal an election, to - trying to steal an election, to regan election. and we can't let that happen. —— a case where they are trying to steal an election, to rig an election.— rig an election. weeks later on janua rig an election. weeks later on january six. — rig an election. weeks later on january six. just _ rig an election. weeks later on january six, just as _ rig an election. weeks later on january six, just as law - rig an election. weeks later on i january six, just as law makers january six, just as [aw makers sought to confirm joe biden's vic doree, donald trump again said the election was read. less than two hours later his supporters stormed congress. three years on, donald trump faces criminal charges related to a wide—ranging conspiracy to overturn the election. but despite this and his claims being rejected byjudges and election officials, donald trump continued his attack on
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the credibility of america's democratic institutions. but on his website, you will find this pitch. i seek to dismantle the devastate and restore a democracy from washington corruption once and for all. board donald trump. — corruption once and for all. board donald trump, the _ corruption once and for all. board donald trump, the deep - corruption once and for all. board donald trump, the deep state - corruption once and for all. board donald trump, the deep state and network of bureaucrats working to obstruct him and his policies. his plan to deal with this involves donald trump having more power. the new york times has reported that the former president and his backers aim to strengthen the power of the white house and limit the independence of federal agencies. this comes in various forms.— federal agencies. this comes in various forms. here is one. first i will immediately _ various forms. here is one. first i will immediately reissue - various forms. here is one. first i will immediately reissue my - various forms. here is one. firsth will immediately reissue my 2020 executive order restoring the president's authority to remove rogue bureaucrats and i will world that power very aggressively. this would allow _ that power very aggressively. this would allow the president to remove thousands of career civil servants and replace them with loyalists. donald trump and his people want to be much more effective in enacting policies than they were the last time around. they do what their
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policies than they were the last time around. they do what their policy is to be undermined by nonpolitical or non— appointed government workers. the nonpolitical or non- appointed government workers. the process to find potential— government workers. the process to find potential replacements - government workers. the process to find potential replacements is - find potential replacements is already under way. it is part of what is called project 2025. dozens of conservative organisations have lots of land for a new conservative presidency. ladle lots of land for a new conservative presidency-— lots of land for a new conservative residen . ~ ., ., , presidency. we are looking to bring in a new army _ presidency. we are looking to bring in a new army of — presidency. we are looking to bring in a new army of aligned, _ presidency. we are looking to bring in a new army of aligned, trained i in a new army of aligned, trained and essentially weaponised conservatives ready to do battle against the deep state. the idea that there is _ against the deep state. the idea that there is weaponising - against the deep state. the idea that there is weaponising and i that there is weaponising and babbling will be done is huge scale. axios says: the figure hasn't been confirmed but it is worth putting it in context. in the united states warily have 4000 political appointees and if you compare that to any other democracy in the world, they would say it is a large, large number. in in the world, they would say it is a
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large, large number.— in the world, they would say it is a large, large number. in other words, to no from large, large number. in other words, to go from lr000 _ large, large number. in other words, to go from 4000 to _ large, large number. in other words, to go from 4000 to potentially - large, large number. in other words, to go from 4000 to potentially tens| to go from 4000 to potentially tens of thousands of political appointees would take the us well beyond other western democracies. it would take the us well beyond other western democracies.— would take the us well beyond other western democracies. it would not be merit that would _ western democracies. it would not be merit that would define _ western democracies. it would not be merit that would define employmentl merit that would define employment but rather your loyalty to the winner of the presidency that would not only threaten our democracy, but truly undermined the ability of our government to meet the pressing need that it has to deal with very real problems. in that it has to deal with very real problem-— that it has to deal with very real problems. in response to media re orts problems. in response to media reports about— problems. in response to media reports about project _ problems. in response to media reports about project 2025, - problems. in response to media reports about project 2025, the | reports about project 2025, the trump campaign then released a statement, saying: that may be, but having the ability to replace civil servants is what donald trump wants, as it is ambition to expand presidential powers elsewhere. take that departments and agencies. already the president appoints the heads of many of these, but some agencies are independent, donald trump was to change that. i independent, donald trump was to change that-— change that. i will bring the
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independent _ change that. i will bring the independent regulatory - change that. i will bring the - independent regulatory agencies like the ftc and fcc back under presidential authority as the constitution demands. == presidential authority as the constitution demands. , ,, . ., constitution demands. -- fdc. such a move would — constitution demands. -- fdc. such a move would be _ constitution demands. -- fdc. such a move would be unusual. _ constitution demands. -- fdc. such a move would be unusual. the - constitution demands. -- fdc. such a move would be unusual. the agencies are normally apart from politics. but this push for presidential power isn't a surprise, because trump has a long held belief that the us constitution gives the president full power over all parts of government. he talked about this one in office. . ~ . in office. there i have in article two where _ in office. there i have in article two where l _ in office. there i have in article two where i have _ in office. there i have in article two where i have the _ in office. there i have in article two where i have the right - in office. there i have in article two where i have the right to i in office. there i have in article| two where i have the right to do whatever i want as president, but i don't even talk about that. this interpretation _ don't even talk about that. this interpretation of _ don't even talk about that. this interpretation of the _ don't even talk about that. this interpretation of the constitution is strongly contested, as is another claim made in 2022, after, again, say the last election was stolen, donald trump posted: the termination of all articles of the constitution, justified by a false claim of a stolen election. that feels relevant as we assess
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trump's impact on us democracy. so was his desire to use the presidency to settle scores. i was his desire to use the presidency to settle scores.— to settle scores. i will appoint a real special _ to settle scores. i will appoint a real special prosecutor - to settle scores. i will appoint a real special prosecutor to - to settle scores. i will appoint a real special prosecutor to go . to settle scores. i will appoint a l real special prosecutor to go after the most corrupt president in the history of the united states of america, joe biden. and the entire biden crime family. this description is not based — biden crime family. this description is not based on _ biden crime family. this description is not based on evidence. _ biden crime family. this description is not based on evidence. in - biden crime family. this description is not based on evidence. in this - is not based on evidence. in this pattern of trump threatening opponents with the law has become familiar, but that doesn't make it normal in american democracy. donald trum has normal in american democracy. donald trump has come _ normal in american democracy. donald trump has come forward _ normal in american democracy. donald trump has come forward and _ normal in american democracy. donald trump has come forward and said - normal in american democracy. donald trump has come forward and said he i trump has come forward and said he wants to use his ownjustice department to prosecute his political enemies anyway that he feels he has been prosecuted politically byjoe biden and joe biden'sjustice department. that would be a significant break from american democratic traditions and judicial traditions going back more than a century. this judicial traditions going back more than a century-— judicial traditions going back more than a centu . , ~ , ., , than a century. this week trump was asked about — than a century. this week trump was asked about retribution. _ than a century. this week trump was asked about retribution. he - than a century. this week trump was asked about retribution. he said - than a century. this week trump was asked about retribution. he said he l asked about retribution. he said he won't have time for it if he is re—elected. drum has also been
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during his view of american law and justice when referencing 6january. is called the violent attack on the seat of us democracy "a beautiful day". it is called the hundreds been jailed for what happened hostages. none of this has affected his viability as potential presidential nominee nor is the torrent of false as he continues to pour into america's political discourse, and so is —— republican candidates gather in iowa and the formal process of selecting the nominee begins, trump remains amanda mead. at one recent event there was a question for the crowd. band at one recent event there was a question for the crowd. and you've been seeing _ question for the crowd. and you've been seeing what's _ question for the crowd. and you've been seeing what's going - question for the crowd. and you've been seeing what's going on, - question for the crowd. and you've been seeing what's going on, in i question for the crowd. and you've | been seeing what's going on, in the past few weeks the radical left democrats and their fake news allies have unveiled their newest hoax that donaldj trump and republican party are a threat to democracy. do you believe that?— believe that? would you believe that, believe that? would you believe that. donald _ believe that? would you believe that, donald trump _ believe that? would you believe that, donald trump asks, - believe that? would you believe that, donald trump asks, as - believe that? would you believe that, donald trump asks, as his| that, donald trump asks, as his report does because of what is love. for some who have what trump in recent years the answer is yes, they would believe that a man they are not laughing.
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ros atkins there. it is 26 minutes to eight. tributes are being paid to the trailblazing radio 1 dj annie nightingale, who had died at the age of 83. she was the station's first female presenter, and went on to become its longest—serving host. she championed all genres of music — from prog rock to acid house — and she helped introduce generations to new wave and punk in the 1970s. one of those bands was the buzzcocks. founding member steve diggle has been speaking about her legacy. this is annie nightingale presents on bbc radio one.— on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. thank you _ on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. thank you for— on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. thank you forjoining _ on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. thank you forjoining me. - on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. thank you forjoining me. she - on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. | thank you forjoining me. she had on bbc radio one. hey, hi, hello. i thank you forjoining me. she had a thank you for 'oining me. she had a assion thank you for 'oining me. she had a passion for— thank you forjoining me. she had a passion for what _ thank you forjoining me. she had a passion for what she _ thank you forjoining me. she had a passion for what she was _ thank you forjoining me. she had a passion for what she was talking - passion for what she was talking about. and you've got that wonderful feeling from her, you know, there was a wonderful feeling of freedom about it. and introduce it to music
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that wasn't kind of the mainstream. the first time i saw buzzcocks was when they toured with the clash in the early days. when they toured with the clash in the early days-— when they toured with the clash in the earl da s. , ., , the early days. they might have been sinrain the early days. they might have been singing about — the early days. they might have been singing about the _ the early days. they might have been singing about the queen's _ the early days. they might have been singing about the queen's speech - the early days. they might have been singing about the queen's speech in l singing about the queen's speech in parliament prawle i knew, even then it was— parliament prawle i knew, even then it was obvious they had a lot of potential _ music plays. she was a great things to say about — music plays. she was a great things to say about the _ music plays. she was a great things to say about the buzzcocks. - music plays. she was a great things to say about the buzzcocks. she - to say about the buzzcocks. she always had great things to say about, you know, the sex pistols, de clash, the jam, although, she recognise the new spirit when it came in. she recognise that and played the records and, you know, stood by. a powerful character, and inspirational character and is, you know, they don't make them like that anymore. she was inspirational as a woman and a presenter, dj, free spirit, and also she championed
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punk. spirit, and also she championed unk. ., , spirit, and also she championed unk. . , _, spirit, and also she championed unk. . , ,., ., punk. there have been some wonderful tributes coming — punk. there have been some wonderful tributes coming in. _ we're nowjoined by broadcaster georgie rogers. good morning to you. you obviously from a different generation, different time and place, what did annie nightingale mean to you? i think she was so inspiring in a sense that she brought so much authenticity to it and was, you know, she carved out a niche where she was able to play what she wanted and say what she wanted and do broadcasting in that way that was so real and cool and, you know, the fact that she joined radio one in 1970 and it would be another 12 years until another female broadcaster came on board, isaiah lovely quote from madonna saying she didn'tjust open the door, she was the door, so she inspired a whole generation of female broadcasters that i suppose so looked up to and also newer broadcasters around
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today, her reach was that far. yes. today, her reach was that far. yes, as ou today, her reach was that far. yes, as you say. — today, her reach was that far. yes, as you say. when _ today, her reach was that far. yes, as you say, when you _ today, her reach was that far. yes, as you say, when you have - today, her reach was that far. yes, as you say, when you have that length of career, obviously you are doing something right. what you think, was it her love of music and the curiosity about people that meant that it always works, it didn't matter what generation it was or who she was talking to, it always just work? or who she was talking to, it always 'ust work? . , just work? yeah, definitely, when ou have just work? yeah, definitely, when you have that _ just work? yeah, definitely, when you have that curiosity _ just work? yeah, definitely, when you have that curiosity and - just work? yeah, definitely, when you have that curiosity and a - you have that curiosity and a passion for music, and, you know, she said herself she was always seeking something new and exciting, always moving with the times, think you can kind of have quite a broad picture of what you play and people accept all of the genres that she championed and all of those new djs that she championed and produces coming through and for artists, you know, to get radio play from someone like annie nightingale is always a really big thing to get, especially early on in their careers, it really does help to get those plays on the radio and she had such a diverse,
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eclectic taste and always kind of delivered it with this knowledge and passion. i've heard a lot of people say she was very funny and, you know, a nice tribute from andy saying she was at the messiest desk in the office, the most fabulous outfits, and the best stories. she will be much missed, i'm sure. i am one of those — will be much missed, i'm sure. i am one of those people _ will be much missed, i'm sure. i am one of those people who _ will be much missed, i'm sure. i am one of those people who was lucky enough to have interviewed her once or twice and she was absolutely charming. and as an overused word, i know, but she was cool. it is kinda one of my assessments. think even if you were learning more about her now, the way she went about was she did, style and everything, there was something very cool about her. yeah. something very cool about her. yeah, think you're — something very cool about her. yeah, think you're right, _ something very cool about her. yeah, think you're right, that _ something very cool about her. yeah, think you're right, that seems - something very cool about her. yeah, think you're right, that seems to - something very cool about her. ie—u think you're right, that seems to be one of there was people using their tributes. and i think it's cool to be cool, right? it's good. anna love the fact that she donned the sunglasses still and that she was
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broadcasting still at 83, right up until the end of last year was incredible. that'sjust until the end of last year was incredible. that's just testament to come in radio, you know, things change, management coming, new management come in, and to be in a job for 53 years is pretty much unheard of. i think that is testament to how much radio1 unheard of. i think that is testament to how much radio 1 like to honour the fact that she was the first woman on the network and testament to her, just to her as a person and her broadcasting passion and skills. . ., person and her broadcasting passion and skills. , ., ., , , and skills. georgie, it has been aood and skills. georgie, it has been good chatting _ and skills. georgie, it has been good chatting to _ and skills. georgie, it has been good chatting to you _ and skills. georgie, it has been good chatting to you this - and skills. georgie, it has been . good chatting to you this morning, thank you very much. i know you and along with a lot of other people paying tribute to annie nightingale. thank you very much for your time this morning. thank you very much for your time this morning-— there is yet another argument, debate... .,, there is yet another argument, debate- - -_ there is yet another argument, debate... ., ,, debate... people hopping off the sofa, debate... people hopping off the sofa. steam _ debate... people hopping off the sofa, steam coming _ debate... people hopping off the sofa, steam coming out - debate. .. people hopping off the sofa, steam coming out of- debate... people hopping off the sofa, steam coming out of the i debate... people hopping off the i sofa, steam coming out of the ears, questioning how on earth four people in st george's park in a little booth can miss what the consensus and the country is saying.— and the country is saying. three little letters. _
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and the country is saying. three little letters. yes, _ and the country is saying. three little letters. yes, they - and the country is saying. three little letters. yes, they can i and the country is saying. three | little letters. yes, they can cause a big row. little letters. yes, they can cause a bi row. ., . little letters. yes, they can cause a big row— little letters. yes, they can cause abiirow. ., . . ~' , ., a big row. you have a goalkeeper who seems he was — a big row. you have a goalkeeper who seems he was impeded _ a big row. you have a goalkeeper who seems he was impeded trying - a big row. you have a goalkeeper who seems he was impeded trying to i a big row. you have a goalkeeper who | seems he was impeded trying to catch a ball, another player passed him, we have caught the pole if you hadn't been fouled? but against luton last night. why not a panel with their buzzes all voting and ask the audience? might as well the way they are going. flan the audience? might as well the way they are going-— they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes. — they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes. i _ they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes, iwill— they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes, i will love _ they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes, i will love that. - they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes, i will love that. are i they are going. can i put a contrary view? yes, i will love that. are we | view? yes, i will love that. are we iioin to view? yes, i will love that. are we going to see _ view? yes, i will love that. are we going to see the — view? yes, i will love that. are we going to see the moment? - view? yes, i will love that. are we going to see the moment? yes. i view? yes, i will love that. are we i going to see the moment? yes. can we run that? it's another match that has sparked a fierce debate about the point and role of var. this is the moment burnley took the lead. that would have been a rare win. but now, this was the equaliser in injury time, you can't really see it there. so james trafford the goalkeeper, was he fouled as morris goes passing? that is the debate. if
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you are in var, in the little office, what would you have done? figs office, what would you have done? 33 you office, what would you have done? is you well know, a no expert on football, i do not know my football. but there are people who have made up but there are people who have made up their minds about that. —— i'm no expert. isn't it the point of var, to make the decisions? t0 expert. isn't it the point of var, to make the decisions? to analyse every little — to make the decisions? to analyse every little nook _ to make the decisions? to analyse every little nook and _ to make the decisions? to analyse every little nook and cranny i to make the decisions? to analyse every little nook and cranny of i to make the decisions? to analyse every little nook and cranny of an l crosstalk that is why people are questioning it. the reason you have it is to say thatis the reason you have it is to say that is correct. michaeljudge that one, i don't know.— one, i don't know. even the luton manaier one, i don't know. even the luton manager said _ one, i don't know. even the luton manager said he _ one, i don't know. even the luton manager said he would _ one, i don't know. even the luton manager said he would have i one, i don't know. even the luton manager said he would have been feeling hard done by fit had been again 16. it seems to be consensus. there was really strong reaction by burley, their part owner called the decision toward the goal... it was in a post on x.
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and burnley manager vincent kompany�*s thoughts weren't far from that. my my views are the same as least anybody who plays the game. fair to the keeper, he blocks them, looks at the keeper, he blocks them, looks at the referee, you think surely not, we have got the will sort him out, this can't decide again, this can't, something else, something done by a bit of magic or something done by... but not this. yeah, that is hard, that comes down to opinion. _ yeah, that is hard, that comes down to opinion, i'm glad it has gone for us tonight — to opinion, i'm glad it has gone for us tonight i— to opinion, i'm glad it has gone for us tonight. i think it is the danger of var. _ us tonight. i think it is the danger of var, that is his fault, if there is one. _ of var, that is his fault, if there is one, comes down to opinion those ones _ is one, comes down to opinion those ones and _ is one, comes down to opinion those ones and i_ is one, comes down to opinion those ones and i think, yeah, i'mjust pleased — ones and i think, yeah, i'mjust pleased it — ones and i think, yeah, i'mjust pleased it has gone for us and mike 0uigley— pleased it has gone for us and mike ouigley of— pleased it has gone for us and mike quigley of that final whistle now it is hard _ quigley of that final whistle now it is hard for— quigley of that final whistle now it is hard for me to really speak any sense _ is hard for me to really speak any sense. a, . is hard for me to really speak any sense. a, , ., is hard for me to really speak any sense. ~._ , ., ., , is hard for me to really speak any sense. a,’ , ., ., , , sense. maybe on the other side they felt james trafford _ sense. maybe on the other side they felt james trafford went _ sense. maybe on the other side they felt james trafford went down i sense. maybe on the other side they felt james trafford went down too i
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felt james trafford went down too easily. the debate will rage on and on. now, some premier league teams have their mini winter break over this weekend, the rest follow next week including injury—ravaged newcastle, who host manchester city in the late kick off. city are five points behind leaders liverpool but they have a game in hand. but their star man erling haaland, won't be back until, the end of the month at least. it was, you know, a little lead in the beginning, in his bone, so every inch, you can do whatever you want, it is a question of time. at the end of this month maybe he will be ready to come back. ii of this month maybe he will be ready to come back-— to come back. if you are a strictly fan watch — to come back. if you are a strictly fan watch the _ to come back. if you are a strictly fan watch the dancing _ to come back. if you are a strictly fan watch the dancing coming i to come back. if you are a strictly fan watch the dancing coming up| fan watch the dancing coming up here. the runaway championship leaders leicester city, make the short trip down the m69, to face coventry city this afternoon, and can extend their lead at the top to 13 points with a win, before second—placed ipswich, host sunderland this evening. while last night, some nifty footwork, and dazzling finish from jonathan rowe, helped norwich win at hull, which means they're now
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just a point behind hull, with both banging on the door of the play—offs. now in germany, bayern munich paid tribute, to football hero franz beckenbauer, in their first game since the legend passed away at the age of 78 on sunday, with the players warming up in beckbenbauer�*s iconic numberfive shirt. the players also wore black armbands during the game, with hoffenheim, last night. beckenbauer made over 400 appeareances for bayern in the '60s and '70s. as for the match, harry kane — who else — scored again in a 3—0 win. his 30th goal of the season for both club and country in all competitions. tributes were paid last night to welsh rugby legend jpr williams, who passed away this week and so ahead of the challenge cup match at ospreys, the sides paid their respects to the former wales and british and irish lions fullback, at their match against perpignan in swansea. there was a a minute's applause, beforehand to honour one of the most exciting players the game has seen.
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as for the action that followed, ospreys later beat perpignan to book a place in the last 16 of the competiton, but newcastle are out, after losing to benetton. on the eve of the australian open, british number one cameron norrie says he is still suffering with a left wrist injury ahead of his first round tie in the early hours of monday morning. it forced him to withdraw from the auckland open, but he's hoping he'll be ready to go in the first grand slam of the year. it is feeling better, like i said, but i'm managing it with my team. i think i'm going to be ready. luckily i am scheduled to play on tuesday, so looking forward to practise tomorrow. abs, moment of perfection, which came
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from nowhere, really, helped mark allen come from 4—1 down, to eventually beat mikesell me. —— mark selby and reach the semi—final of the snooker masters at alexandra palace. both players were making mistakes in a match that went past midnight, but was worth staying up for, as allen, hit a perfect 147, to help turn the match around. what a special place, he said, to do it, and now he will face ali carter in the semis, later today. this was after carter won a last—frame decider, to beatjudd trump 6—5. trump, had threatened to take control, before carter regained his composure to level at five frames all, and then take the decider. a huge win for him, as he looks to improve on his best placing at the masters, which was runner up in 2020. so yes, the semifinals today. you can never forget how special a 147 breakers. it you can never forget how special a 147 breakers-— 147 breakers. it is so hard to do because you — 147 breakers. it is so hard to do because you rely _ 147 breakers. it is so hard to do because you rely on _ 147 breakers. it is so hard to do because you rely on so - 147 breakers. it is so hard to do because you rely on so many i 147 breakers. it is so hard to do i because you rely on so many things aligning. 70 balls dropping in the right place. aligning. 70 balls dropping in the riiht lace. . ~' aligning. 70 balls dropping in the
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right place-— it i aligning. 70 balls dropping in the | right place._ it is right place. thank you, mike. it is 7:47am. back— right place. thank you, mike. it is 7:47am. back with _ right place. thank you, mike. it is 7:47am. back with the _ right place. thank you, mike. it is 7:47am. back with the headlines. right place. thank you, mike. it is. 7:47am. back with the headlines at 8am. now it's time for newswatch. an it scandal involving subpostmasters and mistresses dominates the media landscape. welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. coming up, an itv drama has made the post office scandal headline news. does that mean news organisations failed in covering the story? and is investigative journalism in cases like this getting harder to do? it's not often a television drama prompts a national discussion which seizes hold of the news agenda. but that's certainly been the case with mr bates versus the post office, broadcast last week on itv. it's been largely responsible for emergency laws announced by the government on wednesday, designed swiftly to exonerate and compensate victims of what's now
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recognised as one of the biggest miscarriages ofjustice in british history. that morning, breakfast had devoted large parts of its programme to the issue, including almost the whole hour between eightam and nine am. so, we brought together these nine victims for the first time on live tv to hear about the impact this scandal has had on their lives and what they think should happen next. claire sutherland wrote to us in praise of the programme, "i have just watched an extremely powerful piece about the post office scandal with nine subpostmasters on the red sofa. "i wanted to congratulate bbc breakfast for giving all nine of them the time to talk freely about their ordeals and have their voices heard. "i didn't get the feeling that they were being rushed, that every story was worth listening to. "well done, john and sarah and to the producers for giving it to the time it deserved". but elizabeth williams thought it was given too much time. "i absolutely support those people, and hope those with convictions have
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them quashed and compensation duly paid out to all affected in a speedy manner. "but was it necessary to devote so much of the programme to it? "i appreciate it is human interest filled news, but this was ridiculous. "i want to hear some national and international news before i go to work. bbc breakfast editor richard frediani told us, "bbc breakfast received overwhelming praise from viewers and victims of the post office scandal for giving those wrongly convicted the space and time to tell their stories. "it was the first time they had been able to directly question a minister on television. "the programme also covered the current news agenda of the day, including the middle east, ecuador and concerns about a rise in sex offences committed by children". it wasn't just breakfast that covered the post office scandal extensively this week. that was true of most bbc outlets, and indeed the media in general. but why did it take a tv drama to bring the issue to such prominence?
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even one as powerful as this. tthey say money somehow gone missing from this branch, which it hasn't, and i have to pay it back, which i won't. so i say, "prove it. "prove that i'm wrong and you're right. show me the figures". but they can't or won't do that. so now they want to close me down to shut me up because they don't want everyone knowing what i know. which is? that the fancy new computer system that they've spent an arm and a leg on is faulty. chris williams emailed us to say, "it has taken an itv drama to get this to the top of the political agenda. what has happened to our free press and journalism in general in failing to hold the government to account"? and an anonymous viewer had the same concern. "the story has been running for 25 years, and i would have thought that by the time the number of victims reached 50 or 250 or 500, it might have been recognised by investigative journalists everywhere to be worthy of significant coverage. "it has taken a docu—drama to bring journalists out of the closet.
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"is the reduction in news reporting capacity in the bbc and elsewhere a contributing factor? "how many more scandals have been overlooked"? well, ifjournalism has been found wanting here, and we'll be exploring that question in a moment, there have certainly been some honourable exceptions. the story was first broken back in 2009 by the magazine computer weekly and pursued doggedly over many years by them, by private eye, the daily mail and by the bbc, amongst others. in 2011, nick wallis reported on the scandal on radio surrey and for bbc south. in this edition of the regional current affairs programme inside out. other bbc outlets followed that up, including panorama, the one show and file on four. nick wallis was involved in many of those programmes, including this 2022 panorama, repeated last week, and also presented a podcast series broadcast
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on radio four in 2020. later developed into a book called the great post office scandal. nick wallis, now a freelance journalist who was a consultant on that series, is here with me now. as you know, many people are asking, why did it take an itv drama after all these years to get this story really to everyone's attention? it's quite a complicated story. and in the early days, when you'd go to a busy broadcast news newsroom editor and say, "i've got a story about subpostmasters," and they say,"what�*s subpostmaster? are they employees of the post office"? "well, no, not really. and it's notjust subpostmasters, it's post office managers". "and what's the story here"? "well, they're saying they were put in prison and they weren't guilty of any crimes, but some of them did plead guilty". and it's just quite a difficult, knotty story to tell. and whilst there was growing public awareness of how serious this story was, i think through journalism, it took something huge. it took the resources of itv to commission a drama, which isn't cheap, across prime time television at 9pm every evening on the week
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when no one is going out. do you think it reflects a failure in british journalism that it took the drama to draw people's attention to it fully? i think there's a very proud history of docu—dramas, dramas based on fact, and dramas based on the work ofjournalists which which have resonated with the public. cathy come home by ken loach, of course, is a famous example. jimmy mcgovern's hillsborough was another one as well, which resonated with the public, these dramas, but they're underpinned byjournalism. what the drama did was hit the emotional resonance of the characters lives in a way that hasn't been seen byjournalism because there was literally nothing to film when i got hold of this story first, there was literally people who had experiences that you could interview them about and buildings that you could film. there was nothing that actually spoke in pictures of what had happened to them. so that's why the drama landed, because it's suddenly brought this to life in a way that there wasn't any documentary footage about what was going on in these people's lives before.
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one of the interesting things is the anger about the behaviour of people in senior positions at the post office and around them. and it's interesting, there were very few interviews over the years with anyone from the post office about the horizon it concerns as the story did begin to gather more and more coverage. is that a failure of news media, that there wasn't more work done? that is an absolute failure ofjournalism. and i've said that on the record. we consistently tried to get an interview with paula vennells, and she was — don't forget, the post office is 100% owned by the government — and yet she would not make herself available for interview to talk about any aspect of the scandal. and i don't know why more people weren't asking her that question. if serious news editors from large news organisations had gone to the government and said, "why won't the chief executive the post office give an interview to anyone"? then things might have happened. and i think actually that is one finger that you can point atjournalism. why weren't big news organisations piling in there at the very highest level and saying, "it is unacceptable that this person, this the leader of this organisation who is paid by the taxpayer, is refusing
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to allow herself to be held to account". now, you first worked on this, i think, for radio surrey and the bbc regional tv current affairs series inside out. inside out, of course, no longer exists. it was axed by bbc management a few years ago. bbc local radio budgets have gone down a lot. do you think it would be harder now to get this sort of investigation off the ground at the bbc? yes. it was one of the saddest moments of my career when after the radio four series went out, stories that started to come my way. people who felt something through that radio four series wanted to tell me about their problems and their issues and their injustices in their lives. and some of these stories were really good, and i was waiting for this next series of inside outs to start so that i could start triaging these stories, and then farming them out to various regions around the country and say, "this might not be a national story,
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but this in your region is happening and it's really important. can we make a ten minute film about this"? and it was it was such a disappointment when the bbc canned that series and suddenly there was no or didn't appear to be much of a regional investigative function. and i think it's a crying shame that it doesn't exist in the way that it used to. interesting. a part of the public reaction has been because there is a state of the nation feel about the post office scandal. you mentioned all the people contacting you with their own experiences. it's part of the fabric of the nation. and how so many public institutions and big corporations, corporations seem to get away with treating people badly. do you think there are more stories like this? i have got a pile, a figurative pile, because they all come in as emails nowadays of, i would say, more than 100 stories of people claiming some kind of injustice, whether it's with the hmrc, whether it's in the nhs, it is usually a state—owned organisation. i think there are scandals like this all over the country. hmrc and the nhs are the ones that keep keep coming back to me. but there are many, many more and many, many areas of public life and i wish i had the capacity to go through them all to find out which are the ones that really
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need more investigation. but there aren't the budgets in journalism that there used to be. i mean, you go back to the 60s and the sunday times, it effectively had unlimited budgets to spend years on an investigation that might make one sunday paper. it's just not there any more. nick wallis, thank you so much. thank you, samira. thanks for having me. finally, this very chilly week has been a reminder of the importance to many news audiences of the weather forecast. thursday marked the 70th anniversary of the bbc�*s first televised forecast, and matt taylor looked back on how presentation styles have changed over the years. george cowling was the first meteorologist to step in front of the camera and along with tom clifton, who he shared presenting duties with, brought a slightly more informal approach to the forecast. back then, the forecast came courtesy of two charts and a lot of charcoal. it wasn't until 1974, before the first female weather forecaster, barbara edwards, graced the air. if you look on the chart, you'll see there's outbreaks of rain, sleet...
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the following year, those instantly recognisable weather symbols that we all love were introduced, but they didn't always behave themselves. it was in 1985 when computers and green screen technology changed the landscape of weather forecasts on the bbc forever. i can tell you it's freezing here now. there's more snow forecast next week. but in the meantime, we're keen to hear your views about how the bbc covers the weather, as we'll be inviting the head of bbc weather on the programme soon. please send us all your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news, on tv, radio, online and social media. email newswatch at bbc.co.uk, or you can find us on x, formerly known as twitter, at newswatch bbc. you can call us on 0370106676, and do have a look at previous interviews on our website, bbc.co.uk newswatch. that's all from us for now. thank you forjoining us. and do you think about getting in touch and perhaps even
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coming on the programme? we'll be back to hear more of your thoughts about how the bbc covers the news next week. goodbye. good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... the united states launches a new overnight strike against houthi rebels in yemen,
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a day after the us and the uk bombed targets in nearly 30 locations. it comes after weeks of attacks by the rebels on cargo ships in the red sea — which is key for international trading routes. finance experts say the post office may have underpaid more than £100 million in tax while overpaying top executives. and have you heard of a recruitment scam? they're on the rise and costing victims record amounts. we'll find out what you can do to protect yourself. furore over var again, as luton leave it late to snatch a point in the relegation battle at burnley, but there's anger that the goal was allowed to stand, with the hosts protesting that their keeper was fouled. morning all, it is a quiet start to the weekend. we will chasing ploughed around to begin with, and it will linger across england and wales but more sunshine in scotland and northern ireland but it will start to feel colder, particularly
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in the second half of the weekend, i have all the details coming up on that shortly. it's saturday 13th january. our main story... the united states has confirmed it's carried out a fresh strike on a houthi target in yemen overnight — a day after both the us and uk carried out a series of raids on the iranian—backed group. the operation follows attacks by houthi rebels on shipping vessels in the red sea. the group has said the strikes in yemen will not go without punishment or retaliation. graham satchell reports. before and after — satellite images show the impact of the american and british bombing raids. the americans say airfields and weapons storage depots were destroyed. the raf didn't take part in the attack overnight, but both the british and americans say the raids are vital to keep shipping routes open in the red sea. houthi militia have been
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targeting container ships off the yemeni coast for weeks. sometimes, like this, they have boarded vessels. in other attacks, they used drones and missiles. they say they are disrupting this key shipping route to show their support for palestinians in gaza. yemen sits at a key strategic position in the middle east, especially for global shipping. the normal route from the far east goes around the coast of yemen, through the red sea and the suez canal. it has been significantly disrupted. most vessels are now taking the longer route around southern africa. it means delay and extra cost to global commerce. a huge rally in the yemeni capital, sana'a. protesters burned the american and israeli flags. millions in yemen and across the arab world are appalled by israel's conduct of the war in gaza, and they see the current air strikes by the west as an escalation.
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a houthi military spokesman said british and american criminal aggression would not go unanswered or unpunished. the americans maintain air strikes are a proportionate response, and they're talking down a wider conflict. we absolutely do not want to see an extension of the conflict in gaza broader into the region and will continue to work hard on that. but at the same time, we can't allow the houthis to continue to conduct these attacks, putting innocent mariners' lives at risk and affecting the global economy. the houthis are backed but not controlled by iran. the clear worry now is that what's happening in gaza and the red sea spreads and escalates to the wider region. graham satchell, bbc news.
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our middle east correspondent, hugo bachega, is in beirut this morning. hugo, what has been the reaction to this latest strike by the us? yes, this happened overnight and it was an apt ash much more targeted operation on the one we saw on thursday night. those american and british attacks that targeted 16 houthi positions in nearly 30 locations. —— 60 houthi positions. the american side this attack was carried out with tomahawk cruise missiles and fired out of a us naval ship. they haven't been confirmation about the location, they said they hit a raider that was being used by the houthis. there have been reports that the capital was hit. the americans are saying that this
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operation is aimed at reducing the ability of the houthis to carry out those attacks, targeting commercial vessels in the red sea, we have seen that those attacks have caused major disruption to global trade. there has been a lot of concern about possible economic impact that these impacts could have. last night, we heard from president biden about to take action against the houthis of the attacks continued. he described the attacks continued. he described the attacks continued. he described the attacks as outrageous and the houthis have also retaliated, they say that they are going to carry out a very harsh and painful response and that american and british citizens would be feeling the impact of this response. but so far, the action of the houthis have been muted. charlie, we have been focusing of the horizon scandal with the post
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office but other stories have been emerging. the post office may have underpaid more than £100 million in tax while overpaying its senior executives. that's according to experts the tax policy associates, who say the post office paid less tax by deducting payments to victims of the horizon it scandalfrom its profits. they say this could be a possible breach of tax law. here's our business editor simonjack to explain. what they have been doing is deducting compensation due to victims of the scandal from their reported profits, thereby lowering — in some cases wiping out — their tax bill. now, tax experts have told us that may be a breach of tax law, that you are not normally allowed to deduct fines or compensation for unlawful acts from your profits, they're non—tax—deductible, and as a result the post office may owe over £100 million in unpaid tax. now, in effect the government willjust have to step in and support it as it has in the past. but there is another dimension to this, whereas they have included
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those payments out when it comes to reporting profits, they've stripped them out when it comes to executive pay and bonuses, ignoring those payments, which means they 've been boosting the salary and the bonuses of those executives. now, leading tax lawyer dan neidle, said to me, he's from tax policy associates, if a public company had done this, or a private plc had done this, then the shareholders would be asking for the heads of their senior executives on a platter. meanwhile, the minister responsible for the post office, kevin hollinrake, says he wants people to be jailed over the horizon it scandal. we're joined now by our political correspondent peter saull. peter, what has the minister said? tough talk from the minister responsible for leading the government response to the post office horizon scandal. he was asked on radio four last night about the prospect of criminal prosecutions
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being brought against senior managers at the post office and he said absolutely, they should. if found guilty, ultimately be sentenced to jail. strong words. he is well aware of other ministers of the scale of the public fury about the scale of the public fury about the way the sub—postmaster and mistresses have been treated. the other thing that kevin hollinrake was talking about was the prospect of the post office bringing about its own private prosecution in the future and he said there wasn't a chance in hell of that happening in future. the government looking at that issue, there are lots of other organisations that could bring private prosecutions, it is quite a complex one, but on that it seems the changes coming. the complex one, but on that it seems the changes coming.— the changes coming. the inquiry is all about learning _ the changes coming. the inquiry is all about learning lessons, - the changes coming. the inquiry is all about learning lessons, and i the changes coming. the inquiry isi all about learning lessons, and the tuc is asking questions about what lessons have been learnt more currently really.— lessons have been learnt more currently really. yes, this is to do with legislation _ currently really. yes, this is to do with legislation passed _
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currently really. yes, this is to do with legislation passed last i currently really. yes, this is to do with legislation passed last year i with legislation passed last year designed to improve transparency around the government, other public organisations, and private companies. what the tuc was talking about when this legislation was going through parliament last year was the fact that private companies could be subject to freedom of frate —— freedom of information request and how that happened years ago, the problems with the it system would have come to light much sooner, the governor saying that the procurement act, as it has known, has improved accountability.— act, as it has known, has improved accountability. donald trump has been ordered to pay the new york times more than £300,000 for a failed lawsuit after accusing the newspaper of an insidious plot to obtain his tax records. mr trump's case was dismissed last year and on friday he was ordered to repay the publication's legal fees. the series of articles on the former president's financial affairs won a pulitzer prize. the rate of deforestation in the amazon rainforest halved in 2023, falling to its lowest level
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in five years. it is home to around three million species of plants and animals and is said to be crucial in the fight against climate change. brazil's president has pledged to end deforestation by 2030. people in taiwan are voting for a new president today in elections seen as a core test of the island's relationship with china. the territory rules itself but is claimed by mainland china. our reporter shaimaa khalil in the taiwanese capital of taipei. shaimaa, talk us through why this election so important? we have been enjoying your life broadcast this morning, i think we can see people voting in the voting base behind you. do can see people voting in the voting base behind you.— can see people voting in the voting base behind you. do you know what? polls have actually _ base behind you. do you know what? polls have actuallyjust _ base behind you. do you know what? polls have actuallyjust closed, i polls have actually just closed, just before you close. i can show you what is happening, the counting process is happening right now. ballot boxes are being opened and
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the officials are counting it, and is in the numbers, announcing the names and putting it aside. so, polling has closed, the counting has started. just before i came to speak to you, there were people running into the polling station trying to cast a last—minute vote. there has been a great deal of participation, it has been a steady flow, it is happening right behind us now, this counting, and after that, they will take the numbers and they will send them, they will be announced through them, they will be announced through the central, to the central election but that is after the counting happens. and it feels like this is a very consequential election because of course at the heart of this is that tussle for regional influence between the united states and china and taiwan is at the heart of it and i have been speaking to voters here and around other polling stations and around other polling stations and there are many domestic issues, the economy being the first one, education as well, but really, the front of people's minds, is beijing.
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how they will react. if the ddp when a third term, we are going to see a continuation of the policy, their stance of self—governance away from china's orbit and closer to the united states, that is lightly to anger china. if the kmt when, they are offering more dialogue, better relationship with beijing. there is a third party, the taiwan people's party and it has inspired a lot of young people who thought they were being heard by the establishment parties, if you will, but i think given that the domestic issues are very important to the people here, of course, this is a election that is consequential regionally and it is consequential regionally and it is happening at a very tense political moment for the indo—pacific but right now the focus is going to be a many polling stations like this one as the counting happens and the results come out in a few hours.- counting happens and the results come out in a few hours. thank you
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very much- — come out in a few hours. thank you very much- the _ come out in a few hours. thank you very much. the elections _ come out in a few hours. thank you very much. the elections are i come out in a few hours. thank you very much. the elections are under| very much. the elections are under way, we await the count in taiwan. it is always interesting seeing how other countries do it. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. where is that view? i'm not sure, actually, it is a generic picture just to show what is on the way. so, it is all about the cold, actually, at the next few days. bitterly cold, in actual fact, and at the next few days. bitterly cold, in actualfact, and i think at the next few days. bitterly cold, in actual fact, and i think that'll be me —— be more of a talking point than most of us in the snow. they will be snow at lower levels but i will be snow at lower levels but i will come in to that. cold by day and by night, severe night frosts are likely so bear that in mind for the plants in the garden. the moment, we've got the weather fronts pushing their way southwards across the country, they are opening the door to this arctic air that is going to put all the way south as we going to put all the way south as we go through the week ahead, and you
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really will notice the difference with the feel of the weather. not too bad today, we got a weak weather front across northern ireland and northern england into the midlands and that is producing more cloud across england and wales. east of england will see some sunshine in scotland some sunny spells with a few scattered showers in the far north—west of the great glen but here they will be rain. temperatures generally at around five to 8 degrees so not as cold as his is going to get, we start to see the first signs of the cold air arriving tonight in scotland, some of this notion —— showers will turn to snow at lower levels. we will see some cloud further south which will protect —— prevent the temperatures falling to far so they will be of trust in scotland first thing in the morning, and there is likely to continue to be the risk of some snow showers which will descend to lower levels as well. across england and wales, will be chasing clouds around and with week weather fronts at time, the cloud may be thick enough for a spot or two of rain here and
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there, temperatures once again at five to 7 degrees, starting to get colder in scotland. into monday, still the risk of some snow showers in the north, maybe one or two wintry showers now starting to creep into northern ireland, dry and brighter but colder further south. those snow showers could become more of a feature into northern ireland and northern england as we go into tuesday so anywhere north of that front is likely to continue with the risk of some snow, south of that it will stay dry, settled, sunny, but cold with it, the temperature is really going to start to struggle as we go through the middle part of the week. a maximum of two or three degrees by day across scotland, three of 4 degrees across england and wales. the greater risk of snow is likely to be across the north, as we go into tuesday, perhaps into northern ireland and northern england as well. we didn't think there was a potential for some snow to arrive during the south on wednesday but at the moment of the weather front seems to be skirting
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away to france, obviously still potential for some change but at the moment, it is looking likely that england and wales will stay away from that snow but we are all going to experience the cold. back to you. from cold callers, to bogus text messages — con artists are finding more ways to try to steal our money, or access our personal data. now, so—called "recruitment scams" are on the rise, leaving unsuspecting victims out of pocket after they thought they were applying for a job. dan whitworth from radio 4's money box is here with the details. and elizabeth carter, criminologist is here with us. do you want to do the explaining here, dan, someone thinks they're looking at a job ad, great, good money on offer, then what? , ., , , what? let me give you the numbers festival. what? let me give you the numbers festival- in — what? let me give you the numbers festival. in 2022, _ what? let me give you the numbers festival. in 2022, £20,000 - what? let me give you the numbers festival. in 2022, £20,000 were - festival. in 2022, £20,000 were stolen through this type of scam
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from about 50 people. last year, that numberjumped to nearly £1 million being stolen, so that is 50 times as much as the year before. obviously, there has been an explosion in this type of scam. the way it works is this, you might get a whatsapp a text message come through on your phone and if you are looking for a job, if you have uploaded your cv online, because obviously most of them get deleted but if it hits the right person at the right time straightaway you are hooked in. a lady have been speaking to is called bella, she is 18 years old from devon, and unfortunately this happened to her shortly after herjob loss, she is saving up to be able to go to university, she had stick £3000 stolen after she got hooked in, followed up by dozens of messages from the scammers, they got her personal details, and then essentially they used her card to make four large payments to a cryptocurrency exchange, that is how
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her these —— £3000 were stolen. haste her these -- £3000 were stolen. we are her these —— £3000 were stolen. we are trying to start our life in a very— are trying to start our life in a very expensive world. everything has .one very expensive world. everything has gone up. _ very expensive world. everything has gone up, the gust of cars, moving out _ gone up, the gust of cars, moving out, everything is ridiculously expensive. and you're looking at 'obs expensive. and you're looking at iobs that— expensive. and you're looking at jobs that pay between ten and £13 an houl’i _ jobs that pay between ten and £13 an hour, and _ jobs that pay between ten and £13 an hour, and you've got limited hours, which _ hour, and you've got limited hours, which means— hour, and you've got limited hours, which means you are very likely too full for— which means you are very likely too full for these scams. i had a friend that did _ full for these scams. i had a friend that did it— full for these scams. i had a friend that did it about eight months ago, and i_ that did it about eight months ago, and i was _ that did it about eight months ago, and i was like, i never thought i would _ and i was like, i never thought i would do — and i was like, i never thought i would do it _ and i was like, i never thought i would do it. and then six months later, _ would do it. and then six months later, i_ would do it. and then six months later, i had — would do it. and then six months later, i had done the exact same thing _ later, i had done the exact same thini. �* . later, i had done the exact same thini. �* , ., ., .,, thing. and it is worth noting, those numbers i thing. and it is worth noting, those numbers l was _ thing. and it is worth noting, those numbers i was talking _ thing. and it is worth noting, those numbers i was talking through, i thing. and it is worth noting, those l numbers i was talking through, they are likely to be hugely underreported, i was speaking to the police. as in general with fraud from the people who reported are in a minority because many people don't
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report it because feelings of or shame. i report it because feelings of or shame. . ., ., , , shame. i have had them. completely confused because _ shame. i have had them. completely confused because i'm _ shame. i have had them. completely confused because i'm not _ shame. i have had them. completely confused because i'm not in - shame. i have had them. completely confused because i'm not in the i confused because i'm not in the market looking for a job. this is an opportunity, isn't it, elizabeth? absolutely, this is a volume crime, so it is— absolutely, this is a volume crime, so it is sent — absolutely, this is a volume crime, so it is sent to hundreds of thousands of people and it is only those _ thousands of people and it is only those to— thousands of people and it is only those to which it is relevant that are going — those to which it is relevant that are going to respond, which means these _ are going to respond, which means these fraudsters know there are motivated individuals are looking foriobs _ motivated individuals are looking forjobs that are responding, that is what _ forjobs that are responding, that is what they take advantage of, this willingness. and quite often, they are not— willingness. and quite often, they are not specific in the type ofjob it is that — are not specific in the type ofjob it is that they are sending messages about, _ it is that they are sending messages about, and — it is that they are sending messages about, and they do what is known as beynon _ about, and they do what is known as beynon statements which are very broad _ beynon statements which are very broad statements about the job, you will see _ broad statements about the job, you will see it _ broad statements about the job, you will see it in — broad statements about the job, you will see it in newspapers, on horoscopes for example, you will tribute _ horoscopes for example, you will tribute meaning to something, whatever— tribute meaning to something, whateverjob you are looking for, be it sales _ whateverjob you are looking for, be it sales or— whateverjob you are looking for, be it sales or otherwise. and they build _ it sales or otherwise. and they build their— it sales or otherwise. and they build their sense of urgency by saying — build their sense of urgency by
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saying there is a limited amount of 'obs saying there is a limited amount of jobs available, there are lots of people — jobs available, there are lots of people interested, so you end up not doing _ people interested, so you end up not doing that _ people interested, so you end up not doing thatjew and people interested, so you end up not doing that jew and quickly respond, putting _ doing that jew and quickly respond, putting you into what is known as a hot state — putting you into what is known as a hot state. . . . putting you into what is known as a hot state. . , ., ., ., hot state. that is a good description, _ hot state. that is a good description, you - hot state. that is a good description, you are i hot state. that is a good i description, you are thinking, i must do something, i must do it now. what about the next step, the next episode they encourage you to hand over details. —— so you end up not doing that and you quickly respond. the alarm bells are delves down by the sense of murder —— urgency. they say these are the job details, make it seem attractive and you will respond several times. psychologically, once you have started responding to something, you are buying into it, and it is difficult to delve back and say, wait, is this real or not. they will build on that urgency, on the hot state, and they say these are the
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details you need and these are the details you need and these are the details that we need, and they will build on that credibility and pass you onto an hr department, and this is information you would give to no one else unless you are starting a job, passport, previousjob history, etc. this is all bogus but because it is going along the security processes, they are piggybacking legitimate companies, i call it genre mapping. 50. legitimate companies, i call it genre mapping-— legitimate companies, i call it genre mapping. so, i get you are desierate genre mapping. so, i get you are desperate for — genre mapping. so, i get you are desperate for a _ genre mapping. so, i get you are desperate for a job, _ genre mapping. so, i get you are desperate for a job, bella - genre mapping. so, i get you are desperate for a job, bella had i genre mapping. so, i get you are| desperate for a job, bella had just lost herjob so she is desperate for a newjob, young enough to think careers are open to me, so options are open to me, how do you know? what should you be thinking? they could have a false website if you go to their website, to see if they are legitimate. to their website, to see if they are le i itimate. ~ to their website, to see if they are le i itimate. . ., , to their website, to see if they are legitimate-— legitimate. well, as i said, the victims here — legitimate. well, as i said, the victims here are _ legitimate. well, as i said, the victims here are highly - legitimate. well, as i said, the i victims here are highly motivated, they have often recently lost a job and i really want this to be true,
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so the things you have to really put across here is that no legitimate job will ask you for money upfront, and where they get their money from is that they say, we need to have a little bit of an advance for security checks or they piggyback on this legitimate context that you are going to be working from home so we need to send you computer equipment, we need to have money to send it, we will pay you back in your first pay packet, so it will all make sense, and once you have sent money, you will be likely to send more money, you are investing and it will come back on your first pay packet and if you don't do it, there are other people who will take thatjob in your place. so the thing to do is if your place. so the thing to do is if you do get a message like this, report it, forward it to 7726, that will go to your mobile phone provider. and if you have been a victim of this crime, report it to action fraud or if you are in scotland to dial 101, and remember
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no legitimate company will ask you for money upfront and make sure you do tell someone. nothing is so urgent that you need to reply to send money immediately, keep your friends close. dan send money immediately, keep your friends close.— friends close. dan sometimes has wise words. _ friends close. dan sometimes has wise words, those _ friends close. dan sometimes has wise words, those are _ friends close. dan sometimes has wise words, those are wise i friends close. dan sometimes has wise words, those are wise words| friends close. dan sometimes has i wise words, those are wise words as well, he always says if something is happening, talk to someone in the house, a friend, and say, what do you think? because someone will trigger. ii you think? because someone will trii eir. �* w' you think? because someone will trier. �* , ., you think? because someone will triiier. , ., , trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726. _ trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726. it — trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726, it spells _ trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726, it spells out _ trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726, it spells out spam i trigger. a quick couple of points, that 7726, it spells out spam on | that 7726, it spells out spam on your phone keypad, that is why to 7726. and another thing about working from home, what bella suspects happens to her is because the criminal —— she suspected the criminals downloaded malware which allowed the criminals to take charge of her phone. that is something you have to keep your wits about. fascinating, the scams are happening all the time. it is 8:24am.
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for the past few weeks we've been hearing the devastating stories of former sub—postmasters, whose lives were upended by the post office it scandal that left many bankrupt and with criminal convictions. now, former sub—postmaster gail ward has spoken for the first time on camera about what happened to her. fiona lamdin went to wells in somerset to hear gail's story. this is where it happened 17 years ago, onjanuary the 11th, 2007, at 8.30 in the morning. that's when the auditors arrived. gail ward had run a post office for eight years, but in 2005, faulty software on a computer system called horizon meant she had shortfalls every week. stressful, very stressful. you had to press that button to say that you accepted the figures knowing they were wrong. what did the investigators say to you? "where's the money? "what have you done with the money? "where is it? "what have you bought?" i did nothing.
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i haven't done anything. she was told the post office would drop the charge of theft if she pleaded guilty to false accounting. the solicitor phoned and they're saying, you know, was i ready for court the following week? she said, "and don't forget to bring a bag with you with some personal "items in it." and i said, "why?" she said, "well, just in case you're not coming home." you had a 13—year—old son. yes. what was that like, saying goodbye to him that monday morning? horrendous. he went to school. he went to school that morning not knowing if both his parents would be there when he came home. gail was spared prison, but given community service for a year cleaning trains. i was avoided in the street. people would cross over or they'd be coming towards you. you know, there might be
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two or three of them. and you could see them whispering, and one of them pointing, saying, "that's the one." finally, in 2021, gail had her conviction overturned, but she's never received proper compensation. locals are now beginning to understand what gail went through. thank you. and i know you mean it, thank you. thank you. i wouldn't have got through it without my family. i'm so lucky. compared to some. i'm lucky i've still got a wonderful husband and here i am still fighting, but i'm not on my own because there's a lot of us. fiona lamdin, bbc news. our thanks to gail for telling us her story. we're nowjoined by karl flinders from computer weekly, the publication which first broke
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the post office story back in 2009. very good morning to you. i wonder, first of all, alan bates, upon who this whole story focuses, and for some people very much from the drama, you know him well over the years and you have spoken to him recently? years and you have spoken to him recentl ? . years and you have spoken to him recentl ? , , , ., ,, ., years and you have spoken to him recentl ? , ,, .«i ., ~ ., recently? yes, i speak to alan regularly- _ recently? yes, i speak to alan regularly. recently _ recently? yes, i speak to alan regularly. recently i _ recently? yes, i speak to alan regularly. recently i spoke i recently? yes, i speak to alan regularly. recently i spoke to | recently? yes, i speak to alan i regularly. recently i spoke to him and it is the same response, despite everything that has happened, he is still completely focused on getting fair compensation for everybody and now he is really focused on making sure everybody gets a wrongful conviction overturned. he is very single—minded. this conviction overturned. he is very single-minded.— conviction overturned. he is very single-minded. this is clay not the most important — single-minded. this is clay not the most important thing _ single-minded. this is clay not the most important thing in _ single-minded. this is clay not the most important thing in this i single-minded. this is clay not the most important thing in this story | most important thing in this story but i understand he is aware of some people saying he should be knighted, is that a conversation you had with him? i is that a conversation you had with him? . . . , is that a conversation you had with him? ., , is that a conversation you had with him? .. ., , .. ., him? i did actually call him i told him? i did actually call him i told him that the _ him? i did actually call him i told him that the computer— him? i did actually call him i told him that the computer weekly i him? i did actually call him i told| him that the computer weekly has style doesn't allow him to call
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people sir, and he has a very good sense of humour. i think he said, well if i get one, i get one, if i don't, i don't, well if i get one, i get one, if i don't, idon't, i well if i get one, i get one, if i don't, i don't, i don't think it is very important to him, to be honest. but i think of any one deserves anything like that, he definitely does. �* . ., anything like that, he definitely does. �* , ., ., ., , does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that- — does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that. tell _ does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that. tell us _ does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that. tell us a _ does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that. tell us a little - does. i'm sure a lot of people will echo that. tell us a little bit i does. i'm sure a lot of people willi echo that. tell us a little bit more about as we go back in time, when where you first involved in the story. when did you realise the scale of what was going on, as a journalist, as you are making your investigations? ii i journalist, as you are making your investigations?— investigations? ifi go back sli . htl investigations? ifi go back slightly further _ investigations? ifi go back slightly further first - investigations? ifi go back slightly further first to - investigations? ifi go back. slightly further first to 2004, before i was at computer weekly, that was the first letter from alan bates to a genus called tony collins, but nothing happened with the story, but four years later, another supporter contacted, they put one on one together, to people, and one of my colleagues, rebecca thompson, did an investigation, she
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wrote the first story, and then she left a year later and i took over in 2010, but we saw there were quite a lot of threads from the post office from when rebecca was doing the first investigation, there was times, you are worried about being sued if you are suggesting a software doesn't work, there is a chance they might sue you, so you could sort of tell, and also the fact that the post office were saying the system has no errors, that can't be true, people who work in it although that systems have errors, medically with the complex systems like this. so it is a kind of story you want to work on, big company is denying something, a big public sector organisation is denying something, people are suffering, and there is a pretty something there. that's a very good explanation where big organisations are doing things
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to little people. i use that word loosely. the drama, of course, has brought lots more people to this story and now people are going, "well, yeah, absolutely get it now". that's a very strange twist and it must be for you and your colleagues, who worked so hard as journalists to have a drama kind of bring the focus to it. i have a drama kind of bring the focus to it. . ., , , have a drama kind of bring the focus toit. , , . to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think— to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think it — to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think it should _ to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think it should take - to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think it should take a - to it. i completely was shocked and i don't think it should take a drama| i don't think it should take a drama to get where we are. but i'm so happy about it, so ecstatic. i'm shocked, ecstatic, and exhausted. really, that trauma has done what... the one missing piece in allen's fight was public anger. he's done everything else, he's taken them to the high court, they have thrown 100 million at him and they have beaten him. and people had their convictions overturned because of that. the first thing he said to me when he came out of the high court
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with that victory wasn't, "yeah, we won, we are celebrating", he said i want a public inquiry and that is what he got. that is ongoing. some of the things coming out there are just incredible. on your point about how people are recognising it, i was at the public inquiry on thursday, the first one since christmas. obviously, there wasn't a seat spare for the first time ever, it was a packed house. you could see people's jaws were hitting the floor, mainstream journalists, from what they were hearing. i was thinking this is not half as bad as what we heard the last few weeks, it was like a five out of ten in sort of shock compared to what i have seen previously in the inquiry. the key phases are pretty much over now. it has been really interesting talking to you this morning, thank you so much. congratulations, obviously, kudos to yourself and the people who
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have worked for computer weekly for so many years to bring it to public attention, thank you so much. thank ou. the attention, thank you so much. thank yom the time _ attention, thank you so much. thank yom the time is _ attention, thank you so much. thank you. the time is 8:32am. _ the united states military carried out a further strike in yemen overnight, a day after a joint offensive with the uk targeted nearly 30 houthi locations in the country. the joint military strikes were in response to nearly two months of attacks by the iran—backed houthi movement on cargo ships in the red sea, which the group says is in defence of palestine. the us says its objective was to destroy houthi military infrastructure and munitions and make it more difficult for the group to target cargo ships. the red sea shipping route is typically one of the busiest in the world, transporting around 15% of all goods from the far east to europe through the suez canal. but in response to the latest attacks, many major shipping firms have diverted around the southern tip of africa. it takes ten days longer, adding $1 million to the average container ships'
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fuel costs and causing delays to production. this is already having a knock—on effect in europe. car—makers tesla and volvo have halted some production as components are held up, and on the high street, next and ikea have warned of delays. if the conflict escalates, there could be an even bigger impact on the british economy, as one fifth of oil also travels through this route, as well as liquid gas from qatar. let's speak now to conservative mp alicia kearns, who is chair of the foreign affairs select committee. alicia kearns, thank you very much forjoining us on breakfast. why were these strikes necessary now, in your opinion? were these strikes necessary now, in your opinion?— were these strikes necessary now, in your opinion? since november, there have been about _ your opinion? since november, there have been about 26 _ your opinion? since november, there have been about 26 attacks _ your opinion? since november, there have been about 26 attacks on - your opinion? since november, there have been about 26 attacks on either| have been about 26 attacks on either merchant ships or even the royal navy going through that really important stretch of water and you touched on their how important this stretch of water is. you have a terrorist group who were terrorising the waters. last week, we saw the
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biggest attack on a royal navy warship in decades. this matters because we shouldn't have a terrorist group terrorising waters. the reality is that this is one of the most important water straits and we need to get through. the impact will be felt in terms of all prices going up or entrenched inflation. there are serious concerns. the fundamental freedom of movement in water is something enshrined within the un charter. this is really important. the un charter. this is really important-— the un charter. this is really imortant. . i, , . important. have they been effective? the have important. have they been effective? they have already _ important. have they been effective? they have already been _ important. have they been effective? they have already been attacked - they have already been attacked since the strikes took place stop there has been one missile fired since the strike took place. it didn't cause any damage. it is not a surprise the houthis would want to respond to show they would not be cowed by this. we will have to wait and see. we have to hope these strikes can degrade the houthis worst possible capabilities, the drones they have been using and the strikes they have been targeting and firing. we will have to wait and
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see. i really hope... this is all about re—establishing deterrence. there have been warnings that we would fight to re—establish that waterway. the operation was set up first back in november, this wasn't some swift reaction or gut reaction, this was a slow decision. military action is never a decision taken lightly and we have got to this point because the houthis have been escalating and escalating. beyond the risk of lives being lost was also a risk of an environmental or marine disaster and hopefully that will now be avoided but we have to wait and see. figs will now be avoided but we have to wait and see-— will now be avoided but we have to wait and see. as you say, there has been escalating _ wait and see. as you say, there has been escalating for— wait and see. as you say, there has been escalating for some _ wait and see. as you say, there has been escalating for some time - wait and see. as you say, there has been escalating for some time as i wait and see. as you say, there has. been escalating for some time as the houthis have attacked particularly in this shipping route. if this has been going on for some time, do you understand the debate about why parliament should or could have been recalled before the strikes? to give the green light? i recalled before the strikes? to give the green light?— the green light? i would have liked to have seen _ the green light? i would have liked to have seen parliament _ the green light? i would have liked to have seen parliament recalled l to have seen parliament recalled yesterday or today to debate and scrutinise what happens next. what are the risks, how are we making
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sure that our people and footprint in iraq are protected and the situation in lebanon? it would have been difficult for the government to ask permission for this activity by recalling parliament. there is no requirement to do so in the way our system works but we would have essentially told the houthis we are going to conduct air strikes, move anything you are currently using as anything you are currently using as a core operation site or assets you can because we are coming for you. there is a real balance here. as you can tell from early in the week, i am a big fan of scrutiny of the government. but you cannot do a situation where you are warding off the enemy. the government hasn't reached any sort of requirement in the political system in the way in which we operate. aha, the political system in the way in which we operate.— which we operate. a houthi spokesperson _ which we operate. a houthi spokesperson has - which we operate. a houthi spokesperson has said - which we operate. a houthi spokesperson has said that | which we operate. a houthi. spokesperson has said that a which we operate. a houthi _ spokesperson has said that a message to britain and the us is that they will pay a heavy price for this
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aggression. what do you interpret by that? �* ., ., �* ., ., that? although i don't have an intelligent _ that? although i don't have an intelligent incessant _ that? although i don't have an intelligent incessant in - that? although i don't have an intelligent incessant in front . that? although i don't have an| intelligent incessant in front of me, i don't believe the houthis have the ability to do something in the uk but they have a footprint within yemen and their ability to fire quite farfrom yemen yemen and their ability to fire quite far from yemen because the iranians have given them quite significant capabilities and we saw them acquire one missile. my immediate concern is for our amazing royal navy personnel who continue to operate there and continue to protect the waterways but also for those in iraq and lebanon. of course we will see them say this, same thing as we have seen from hezbollah when they said there will be fire and brimstone response and they have chosen not to do so. we will have to wait and see what this means. lots of it will be down to how much they have been degraded by these air strikes. irate have been degraded by these air strikes. ~ ., have been degraded by these air strikes. ~ . ., ., , ., strikes. we are waiting to see how the impact — strikes. we are waiting to see how the impact of _ strikes. we are waiting to see how the impact of these _
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strikes. we are waiting to see how the impact of these strikes - strikes. we are waiting to see how the impact of these strikes plays l the impact of these strikes plays out on the houthis but this is an iranian—backed group. the international reaction has been really strong from various quarters. how do you think this will play out internationally in terms of tensions and relationships? the internationally in terms of tensions and relationships?— and relationships? the houthis are and relationships? the houthis are an all of and relationships? the houthis are an ally of lran. _ and relationships? the houthis are an ally of iran, not _ and relationships? the houthis are an ally of iran, not necessarily - and relationships? the houthis are an ally of iran, not necessarily a i an ally of iran, not necessarily a proxy, they don't always do what they are told by the iranians and they are told by the iranians and they have always been significantly armed by then. iran is the foremost sponsor of terror around the world, i have concerns about that of course. i'm not convinced to what extent the iranians want to cause trouble for themselves by going into back beach houthi, that isn't something i am privy to in terms of that assessment. we have to be very
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careful because we see the russians try to take advantage of this for example and call for a un security council meeting when only on thursday, the un security council met and said that there had to be an end to houthis attacks and under the un charter article 51 there is a right to self defence when it comes to maritime freedom. many others and the russians are trying to this narrative that the houthis that are trying to... they are not. they have been around for a very long time committing appalling atrocities within yemen and causing trouble on the waterways. they are using palestine as one of their narratives is to get themselves status. there is to get themselves status. there is a competing thing between terrorist groups in the middle east, those who are seen as the most pro—palestinian get the most kudos and credit on the terrorist street. that is why the houthis are acting in support of palestine they are claiming that they had done nothing in the interest of palestine. it is really important we don't allow russia or anyone else, the iranians, to claim any thing to do with gaza.
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this is about not being able to move through maritime spaces. midas through maritime spaces. alicia kearns, chair— through maritime spaces. alicia kearns, chair of _ through maritime spaces. alicia kearns, chair of the _ through maritime spaces. alicia kearns, chair of the foreign - through maritime spaces. alicia kearns, chair of the foreign select committee, thank you for your time on breakfast. mike is here with the sport and there is a predictability sometimes about reporting on a match and a var. and reporting on a match and a var. and there is a split _ reporting on a match and a var. fific there is a split second reporting on a match and a var. fific there is a split second decisions reporting on a match and a var. e"ic there is a split second decisions in there is a split second decisions in the outcome of a match, which we saw last night, and then it is a subjective thing. in this case, whether a goalkeeper goes up against a defender and falls down, how much of a push is there? does he go down too easily? was he forced down? and that has decided the outcome of last night. some really strong feelings on this one in a match that meant so much, because of burnley and luton's desperate fight to escape the relegation zone. the controversy surrounding luton's late equaliser, which the host felt should have been ruled out because of a foul. gavin ramjaun reports. a warm embrace on a cold night at turf moor. burnley�*s players were not in such a welcoming mood. they may have had one home when all season, but things were looking up shortly before the break.
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relief for vincent kompa ny. frustration grew in the second half of luton. the search for an equaliser proving difficult. carlton morris off the bench and way off the mark. but he would get a second chance to strike, spotted in the box, and rising highest to pull his side level in stoppage time. the only question now — what had var spotted? after a lengthy delay, the answer was nothing — no foul on goalkeeper james trafford. luton leading lancashire on the coat—tails of the sides above them. burnley once again struggling for home comforts. gavin ramjaun, bbc news. now, half of premier league teams are on a winter break this weekend, while the others get to put their feet up next week, including the likes of chelsea and fulham, who meet today. it's a case, then, of having the neighbours around, and both lost in their respective league cup semifinal first legs in the week, so this is a chance to bounce back in the heat of a local derby. ok, it's a special one and no doubts about it, when you have... ok, in london, you have a big number of derbies, if you can say in this way, of course. but you have always one or two more special for the fans and, at the end, we play for the fans and we know how important it is
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for them, certain type of games. and this one is one of these games. and tributes were paid last night to welsh rugby union legend jpr williams, who passed away this week and so ahead of the challenge cup match at ospreys, the sides paid their respects to the former wales and british & irish lions fullback, at their match against perpignan in swansea. his famous number 15 shirt paraded in swansea. there was a minute's applause beforehand to honour one of the most exciting players the game has seen. as for the action that followed, ospreys later beat perpignan to book a place in the last 16 of the competiton. the night was remembered for the tributes. england and saracens prop mako vunipola says "all good things come to an end" as he announced his retirement from international rugby. vunipola made his test debut against fiji in november 2012, and won 79 england caps. the three—time british and irish lions tourist, and irish lions tourist was ruled out of england's 2023
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world cup squad, with a back problem and says "the time has come to step away". disappointment for britain's jack draper who has lost the men's singles final at the adelaide international. draper took the first set against, yiri lehedgeka, but the czech player went on to win the next two, despite draper winning this rally in the second set. that couldn't get him over the line though, and draper must now pick himself up, before his australian open campaign in the early hours of tuesday morning. it's been a great morning for tommy fleetwood in dubai so far, four birdies in total has shot him up the leaderboard at the dubai invitational. one of those birdies was almost an eagle, so close to the hole. though frustrating when that happens! he settled for a birdie in
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the end and he settled for an eagle. fleetwood is now up to the top of the leaderboard. one shot ahead of rory mcilroy. plenty of grey skies around at the moment, charlie but for most of us, the weather story is on the change as we head into next week, called for all of us. a risk of snow even at lower levels, which is likely to cause disruption. if you don't have the snow, you have clear skies and then night—time frosts. the high pressure is drifting away. we have this weather front pushing its weight steadily south which will continue through this weekend. it will introduce cloud moving out of northern ireland into northern england. anywhere south of that, we will chase cloud around and it will be rather grey. behind it, clearance with sunny spells and scattered showers to the far north of scotland, another weather front pushing in here. it stays relatively
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mild compared to of late. 5 hyphenate degrees. —— 5—8 degrees. the weak weather front across england and wales gives a spare amount of cloud, preventing temperatures falling low enough for a touch of frost. clear skies further north, a chilly start into scotland and into tomorrow, that cold air will start to feed into the far north of scotland. that means showers will turn to snow at lower levels. mostly to the north of the great glen and into aberdeenshire. south of that, we will have a little bit more cloud into central and southern england, thick enough for a spot or two of drizzle. so much between the two, some sunny spells and temperatures around 5—6. monday, we keep the risk of snow in scotland and wintry showers in northern ireland. it stays bright but chilly elsewhere. there is a risk on monday night of this weather front introducing more snow across northern ireland and northern
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england. anywhere north of that front is at risk of seeing snow at lower levels, which could cause some disruption. to the south of that, it stays cold but at the moment it looks likely to stay dry with some sunshine. temperatures only if few degrees above freezing, a bitterly cold day on tuesday. —— only some degrees above. thursday we thought this would impact the far south but it looks likely to push off into france, not even impacting the channel isles but keep watching because it could drift a bit further north but at the moment, this is likely into next weekend, gradually we introduce milder and wetter weather back into the story, which would you prefer? old and sunshine or wet and would you prefer? old and sunshine orwetand mild? stadium—mac would you prefer? old and sunshine or wet and mild? stadium—mac old and sunshine for me! every time! me or wet and mild? stadium-mac old and sunshine for me! every time!— things are about to get very
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colourful for you. drag fans from around the world are gathering in london today — for what ru paul is calling the "most inclusive party on earth" — the third annual uk drag con. celebrating all things drag culture, around 180 queens will "sashay" down the pink carpet for the official opening of the event this morning, and our lgbt and identity reporter josh parry is there for us. looking fabulous behind you, good morning, josh. looking fabulous behind you, good morning. josh-— looking fabulous behind you, good morning, josh. morning. yes, as you sa , morning, josh. morning. yes, as you say. charlie. — morning, josh. morning. yes, as you say. charlie. it _ morning, josh. morning. yes, as you say, charlie, it is _ morning, josh. morning. yes, as you say, charlie, it is colourful— morning, josh. morning. yes, as you say, charlie, it is colourful here - say, charlie, it is colourful here but also chaotic. you might have to bear with us a bit but also chaotic. you might have to bear with us a hit this morning because trying to get this lot ready at this time in the morning was never going to be straightforward, was it? 197 drag queens here today. they will be stomping down this pink carpet in a moment.— carpet in a moment. interference this is a uk's — carpet in a moment. interference this is a uk's official _ carpet in a moment. interference this is a uk's official meet - carpet in a moment. interference this is a uk's official meet up, - this is a uk's official meet up, convention, party for drag race that
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catapulted drag into the mainstream. 15 series and hundreds of creams have passed through that werkroom. —— hundreds of queens. people can meet and greet with their favourite queens, they can buy wigs, make—up, jewellery, all of that kind of drug paraphernalia. it is a world of colour. it is quite weird at this type of —— this time of mourning. one of the people taking part today on the pink carpet is cheryl from drag race uk series one and fenton bailey, who is one of the co—founders of world of wonder, a company that produces drag race. cheryl, tel me, chaos this morning? it is always chaos, but it is fabulous. _ it is always chaos, but it is fabulous, isn't it?- it is always chaos, but it is fabulous, isn't it? what is it like bein: fabulous, isn't it? what is it like being around — fabulous, isn't it? what is it like being around almost _ fabulous, isn't it? what is it like being around almost 200 - fabulous, isn't it? what is it like being around almost 200 other| fabulous, isn't it? what is it like - being around almost 200 other queens from the series all coming together, do you often get this chance? ida.
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do you often get this chance? no, drau con do you often get this chance? no, drag con is _ do you often get this chance? no, drag con is a _ do you often get this chance? no, drag con is a time _ do you often get this chance? no, drag con is a time to celebrate everything that we love, which is drag, _ everything that we love, which is drag, love, — everything that we love, which is drag, love, positivity, and bring a community— drag, love, positivity, and bring a community and show that we are not going _ community and show that we are not going anywhere. community and show that we are not going anywhere-— community and show that we are not going anywhere. fenton, you are one ofthe going anywhere. fenton, you are one of the organisers _ going anywhere. fenton, you are one of the organisers of _ going anywhere. fenton, you are one of the organisers of this _ going anywhere. fenton, you are one of the organisers of this event, - of the organisers of this event, tell me, how important is an event like this to the lgbt community and beyond? i like this to the lgbt community and be ond? ~ , ., ., ., like this to the lgbt community and be ond? ~' , . . ., , beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves _ beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves on _ beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves on tv _ beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves on tv and - beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves on tv and also - beyond? i think it is amazing for us to see ourselves on tv and also to| to see ourselves on tv and also to be able _ to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to— to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to meet— to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to meet in— to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to meet in person - to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to meet in person and - to see ourselves on tv and also to be able to meet in person and to. to see ourselves on tv and also to l be able to meet in person and to get togethen _ be able to meet in person and to get togethen the — be able to meet in person and to get together. the energy— be able to meet in person and to get together. the energy here, - be able to meet in person and to get together. the energy here, the - be able to meet in person and to get together. the energy here, the sortl together. the energy here, the sort of feeling _ together. the energy here, the sort of feeling of— together. the energy here, the sort of feeling of brotherhood _ together. the energy here, the sort of feeling of brotherhood and - of feeling of brotherhood and community— of feeling of brotherhood and community and _ of feeling of brotherhood and community and fellowship . of feeling of brotherhood and community and fellowship isl of feeling of brotherhood and - community and fellowship is amazing. these _ community and fellowship is amazing. these artists — community and fellowship is amazing. these artists have _ community and fellowship is amazing. these artists have come _ community and fellowship is amazing. these artists have come from - community and fellowship is amazing. these artists have come from all - these artists have come from all over— these artists have come from all over the — these artists have come from all over the world, _ these artists have come from all over the world, there _ these artists have come from all over the world, there are - these artists have come from all over the world, there are 17 - over the world, there are 17 versions— over the world, there are 17 versions of— over the world, there are 17 versions of the _ over the world, there are 17 versions of the show- over the world, there are 17 - versions of the show internationally and they— versions of the show internationally and they have — versions of the show internationally and they have all _ versions of the show internationally and they have all come _ versions of the show internationally and they have all come here. - versions of the show internationally and they have all come here. it - versions of the show internationally and they have all come here. it is l and they have all come here. it is chaos, _ and they have all come here. it is chaos, but— and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it _ and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it is _ and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it is the _ and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it is the best- and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it is the best kind - and they have all come here. it is chaos, but it is the best kind of. chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos — chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos if— chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos if you _ chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos. if you can't _ chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos. if you can't get - chaos, but it is the best kind of chaos. if you can't get down . chaos, but it is the best kind of. chaos. if you can't get down here, you could — chaos. if you can't get down here, you could always _ chaos. if you can't get down here, you could always watch _ chaos. if you can't get down here, you could always watch it - chaos. if you can't get down here, you could always watch it on - chaos. if you can't get down here, you could always watch it on the l you could always watch it on the website — you could always watch it on the website you _ you could always watch it on the website. you will— you could always watch it on the website. you will see _ you could always watch it on the website. you will see all - you could always watch it on the website. you will see all the - you could always watch it on the - website. you will see all the queens walking _ website. you will see all the queens walking this — website. you will see all the queens walking this enormously _ website. you will see all the queens walking this enormously long - website. you will see all the queens walking this enormously long pink . walking this enormously long pink carpet _ walking this enormously long pink
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carpet with— walking this enormously long pink carpet with mashele _ walking this enormously long pink carpet with mashele visage - walking this enormously long pink carpet with mashele visage —— - carpet with mashele visage —— michelle — carpet with mashele visage —— michelle visage. _ carpet with mashele visage —— michelle visage. did _ carpet with mashele visage -- michelle visage.— carpet with mashele visage -- michelle visage. did you think it would have _ michelle visage. did you think it would have this _ michelle visage. did you think it would have this much _ michelle visage. did you think it would have this much success i michelle visage. did you think it i would have this much success and longevity. ru would have this much success and lonrevi . ., would have this much success and lonevi . . longevity. ru says you are born naked and _ longevity. ru says you are born naked and dressed _ longevity. ru says you are born naked and dressed as - longevity. ru says you are born naked and dressed as drag. - longevity. ru says you are born naked and dressed as drag. i i longevity. ru says you are born i naked and dressed as drag. i don't know— naked and dressed as drag. idon't know why— naked and dressed as drag. idon't know why it— naked and dressed as drag. i don't know why it wasn't _ naked and dressed as drag. i don't know why it wasn't on _ naked and dressed as drag. i don't know why it wasn't on tv - naked and dressed as drag. i don't know why it wasn't on tv before. i naked and dressed as drag. i don't. know why it wasn't on tv before. —— ru paut— know why it wasn't on tv before. —— ru paul says — know why it wasn't on tv before. —— ru paul says. there _ know why it wasn't on tv before. —— ru paul says. there is _ know why it wasn't on tv before. —— ru paul says. there is something i know why it wasn't on tv before. ——| ru paul says. there is something for everyone _ ru paul says. there is something for everyone in— ru paul says. there is something for eve one. ., ru paul says. there is something for eve one. . ., ~ . everyone. in a moment, michelle visaae everyone. in a moment, michelle visage will _ everyone. in a moment, michelle visage will cut _ everyone. in a moment, michelle visage will cut the _ everyone. in a moment, michelle visage will cut the pink _ everyone. in a moment, michelle visage will cut the pink ribbon . visage will cut the pink ribbon opening drag con officially but in the meantime, i will try to get my way around this chaos later. studio: good luck, way around this chaos later. studio: good luck. it — way around this chaos later. studio: good luck, it looks _ way around this chaos later. studio: good luck, it looks like _ way around this chaos later. studio: good luck, it looks like a _ way around this chaos later. studio: good luck, it looks like a challenge i good luck, it looks like a challenge but great fun. it does look like fun. the winners of this year's portrait of britain competition have been revealed — and there's100 photographers who've been awarded the top prize for their efforts. the images, which aim to capture the diverse faces and stories of modern—day britain, will be exhibited across the uk. let's take a look at some
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of those winning pictures. soft violin music plays.
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it is just it isjust one it is just one of those things, a single image that you can just... it is just one of those things, a single image that you canjust... i mean, we went through them may be a little bit too quickly but when you rest on an image, just focus on the faces and the people, it works. and there is such a skill in capturing there is such a skill in capturing
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the moment in time, the perfect moment in time. we are nowjoined by zoe harrison from the britishjournal of photography, and also one of the winners of this years competition brian o'hanlon — as well as shae brennan, who was the subject of brian's portrait. i can't say ijudged them. those images were a selection of the winners and shortlist. fik. images were a selection of the winners and shortlist. i}!(. all those winners and shortlist. 0k. all those imaues, winners and shortlist. ok. all those images, the winners and shortlist, they will be published, it is beautiful, highly recommend. what's really exciting of portrait of britain, it is a brilliant award and i get to see the images every year and we get a huge number of entries. but what is really exciting is 100 of the images are selected as winners. including ourselves. you have a waist _ winners. including ourselves. you have a waist on _ winners. including ourselves. you have a waist on the _ winners. including ourselves. you have a waist on the introductions for us. ryan o'hanlon is with us, good morning. and seamus brennan, you told us shea. jim! good morning. and seamus brennan, you told us shea.— you told us shea. jim! that is a gaehc you told us shea. jim! that is a gaelic for— you told us shea. jim! that is a gaelic forjim. _ you told us shea. jim! that is a gaelic forjim. and _ you told us shea. jim! that is a gaelic forjim. and the - you told us shea. jim! that is a gaelic forjim. and the reason l
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you told us shea. jim! that is a - gaelic forjim. and the reason shay is here, gaelic forjim. and the reason shay is here. you _ gaelic forjim. and the reason shay is here. you are — gaelic forjim. and the reason shay is here, you are pals, _ gaelic forjim. and the reason shay is here, you are pals, family - is here, you are pals, family friends? there is an image we should put up now and brian, you can see it is behind us. that is you, shay, isn't it? that is a big image of you! is isn't it? that is a big image of ou! , ., isn't it? that is a big image of you!_ what - isn't it? that is a big image of you!_ what is - isn't it? that is a big image of| you!_ what is going isn't it? that is a big image of - you!_ what is going on, you! is that me? what is going on, what is the — you! is that me? what is going on, what is the situation? _ you! is that me? what is going on, what is the situation? this - you! is that me? what is going on, what is the situation? this is - you! is that me? what is going on, what is the situation? this is a - you! is that me? what is going on, what is the situation? this is a set| what is the situation? this is a set of ortrait what is the situation? this is a set of portrait l _ what is the situation? this is a set of portrait i did _ what is the situation? this is a set of portrait i did at _ what is the situation? this is a set of portrait i did at home, - what is the situation? this is a set of portrait i did at home, i - what is the situation? this is a set of portrait i did at home, i was - of portrait i did at home, i was practising _ of portrait i did at home, i was practising for a job, i was being sent— practising for a job, i was being sent to — practising for a job, i was being sent to india to photograph eminent scientists— sent to india to photograph eminent scientists and i needed to do some homework — scientists and i needed to do some homework. i invited family and friends — homework. i invited family and friends over to photograph them in portrait— friends over to photograph them in portrait and shay was one of them. we had _ portrait and shay was one of them. we had some whiskeys together on a sunday— we had some whiskeys together on a sunday afternoon. we chatted about shay's _ sunday afternoon. we chatted about shay's life _ sunday afternoon. we chatted about shay's life and history and the many 'obs shay's life and history and the many jobs he _ shay's life and history and the many jobs he has — shay's life and history and the many jobs he has had. obviously, we spoke about— jobs he has had. obviously, we spoke about mary, _ jobs he has had. obviously, we spoke about mary, his wife and shay being quite religious. he looked into the sky and _ quite religious. he looked into the sky and said a little prayer and i took— sky and said a little prayer and i took the — sky and said a little prayer and i took the shot and i thought maybe i
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overstepped my boundaries. when i spoke _ overstepped my boundaries. when i spoke to— overstepped my boundaries. when i spoke to shay and showed him the photograph afterwards he appreciated i had taken a picture of a special moment — i had taken a picture of a special moment. . , , , ., moment. shay, when we see your icture, moment. shay, when we see your picture. the _ moment. shay, when we see your picture, the moment _ moment. shay, when we see your picture, the moment we - moment. shay, when we see your picture, the moment we see - moment. shay, when we see your picture, the moment we see is . moment. shay, when we see your. picture, the moment we see is when you are talking about mary. explain why you look up when you are talking about mary. why you look up when you are talking about ma . �* e, , why you look up when you are talking about mary-— why you look up when you are talking about mary. because i hope she is up there! and looking _ about mary. because i hope she is up there! and looking down _ about mary. because i hope she is up there! and looking down on - about mary. because i hope she is up there! and looking down on me. - about mary. because i hope she is up there! and looking down on me. i - there! and looking down on me. i talk to— there! and looking down on me. i talk to her— there! and looking down on me. i talk to her quite a lot, to tell you the truth — talk to her quite a lot, to tell you the truth. she's been dead five years— the truth. she's been dead five years now _ the truth. she's been dead five years now. just over five years. she will be _ years now. just over five years. she will be dead — years now. just over five years. she will be dead six years at the end of june _ will be dead six years at the end of june. ~ , ., , . june. when you met, i understand that it was — june. when you met, i understand that it was a _ june. when you met, i understand that it was a holiday _ june. when you met, i understand that it was a holiday romance - june. when you met, i understand that it was a holiday romance that| that it was a holiday romance that went wrong? its, that it was a holiday romance that went wrong?— that it was a holiday romance that went wronu? �* ., ., ., . , went wrong? a holiday romance. yes. in wicklow, — went wrong? a holiday romance. yes. in wicklow. she _ went wrong? a holiday romance. yes. in wicklow, she was _ went wrong? a holiday romance. yes. in wicklow, she was holidaying - went wrong? a holiday romance. yes. in wicklow, she was holidaying and i l in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just— in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just come — in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just come home _ in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just come home from _ in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just come home from a - in wicklow, she was holidaying and i had just come home from a trip - in wicklow, she was holidaying and i| had just come home from a trip from the far— had just come home from a trip from the far east — had just come home from a trip from the far east i— had just come home from a trip from the far east. i worked _ had just come home from a trip from the far east. i worked for— had just come home from a trip from the far east. i worked for the - the far east. i worked for the liverpool— the far east. i worked for the liverpool company _ the far east. i worked for the liverpool company the - the far east. i worked for the liverpool company the blue i the far east. i worked for the - liverpool company the blue funnel.
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we went— liverpool company the blue funnel. we went to — liverpool company the blue funnel. we went to a — liverpool company the blue funnel. we went to a ballroom. _ liverpool company the blue funnel. we went to a ballroom. these - liverpool company the blue funnel. we went to a ballroom. these fourl we went to a ballroom. these four hits of— we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, — we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, as _ we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, as they— we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, as they used - we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, as they used to - we went to a ballroom. these four hits of stuff, as they used to say, i bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting _ bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting at— bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting at the _ bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting at the bottom _ bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting at the bottom of _ bits of stuff, as they used to say, sitting at the bottom of the - sitting at the bottom of the ballroom _ sitting at the bottom of the ballroom and _ sitting at the bottom of the ballroom and i— sitting at the bottom of the ballroom and i said - sitting at the bottom of the ballroom and i said to- sitting at the bottom of the ballroom and i said to my. sitting at the bottom of the - ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, — ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, i'll— ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, i'll take _ ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, i'll take the _ ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, i'll take the first- ballroom and i said to my mate, "right, i'll take the first one, i ballroom and i said to my mate, i "right, i'll take the first one, you take _ "right, i'll take the first one, you take the — "right, i'll take the first one, you take the second _ "right, i'll take the first one, you take the second one". _ "right, i'll take the first one, you take the second one". so, - "right, i'll take the first one, you take the second one". so, i- "right, i'll take the first one, you take the second one". so, i goes| take the second one". so, i goes down _ take the second one". so, i goes down and — take the second one". so, i goes down and just _ take the second one". so, i goes down and just as _ take the second one". so, i goes down and just as i _ take the second one". so, i goes down and just as i get _ take the second one". so, i goes down and just as i get to - take the second one". so, i goes down and just as i get to the - take the second one". so, i goes down and just as i get to the girl| take the second one". so, i goesl down and just as i get to the girl i was going — down and just as i get to the girl i was going to _ down and just as i get to the girl i was going to take _ down and just as i get to the girl i was going to take up, _ down and just as i get to the girl i was going to take up, rona - down and just as i get to the girl i was going to take up, rona was l down and just as i get to the girl i. was going to take up, rona was her name _ was going to take up, rona was her name and _ was going to take up, rona was her name and her— was going to take up, rona was her name and herfather_ was going to take up, rona was her name and her father was— was going to take up, rona was her name and her father was a - was going to take up, rona was her name and her father was a sailor. was going to take up, rona was her name and her father was a sailor asj name and her father was a sailor as well, _ name and her father was a sailor as well, just— name and her father was a sailor as well, just as — name and her father was a sailor as well, just as l — name and her father was a sailor as well, just as i got _ name and her father was a sailor as well, just as i got to _ name and her father was a sailor as well, just as i got to her, _ name and her father was a sailor as well, just as i got to her, another. well, just as i got to her, another fella _ well, just as i got to her, another fella who— well, just as i got to her, another fella who had _ well, just as i got to her, another fella who had been— well, just as i got to her, another fella who had been dancing - well, just as i got to her, another fella who had been dancing beatl well, just as i got to her, another. fella who had been dancing beat me to her— fella who had been dancing beat me to her stop — fella who had been dancing beat me to her stop of— fella who had been dancing beat me to her stop of course, _ fella who had been dancing beat me to her stop of course, rather- fella who had been dancing beat me to her stop of course, rather than i to her stop of course, rather than stop. _ to her stop of course, rather than stop. i— to her stop of course, rather than stop. i fixed — to her stop of course, rather than stop, i fixed the _ to her stop of course, rather than stop, i fixed the neck— to her stop of course, rather than stop, i fixed the neck —— - to her stop of course, rather than stop, i fixed the neck —— picked . to her stop of course, rather thanl stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next _ stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next one. _ stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next one, who _ stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next one, who happened - stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next one, who happened to i stop, i fixed the neck —— picked up the next one, who happened to be marv _ the next one, who happened to be ma . �* ., ., ~ ., the next one, who happened to be mary-_ that i the next one, who happened to be| mary-_ that is mary. and it all worked out. that is wh it mary. and it all worked out. that is why it was — mary. and it all worked out. that is why it was called _ mary. and it all worked out. that is why it was called a _ mary. and it all worked out. that is why it was called a holiday - mary. and it all worked out. that is| why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th _ why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th of— why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th of august _ why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th of august 1956 _ why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th of august 1956 that - why it was called a holiday romance. the 15th of august 1956 that was. i. the 15th of august 1956 that was. i think the 15th of august 1956 that was. think all of us, brian, who are meeting shay for the first time in getting a little sense of the character, little glimpse, i know,
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because you have been sitting here for a while, you laugh a lot. and yet the image is... can we put it up again? you have laughter in your soul and the image is a very thoughtful and very special moment, isn't it, as you say, very personal? during the session, it was about an hour and _ during the session, it was about an hour and a — during the session, it was about an hour and a half and we chatted about things— hour and a half and we chatted about things and _ hour and a half and we chatted about things and there was lots of animation and i got lots of images of shay— animation and i got lots of images of shay loving to camera, holding his glass — of shay loving to camera, holding his glass of whiskey with a sparkle in his— his glass of whiskey with a sparkle in his eyes— his glass of whiskey with a sparkle in his eyes but through the conversation of the portrait and mary, _ conversation of the portrait and mary, everything stopped and he just closed _ mary, everything stopped and he just closed his— mary, everything stopped and he just closed his eyes and did that. interesting, because his eyes are closed and when you think of a portrait... this is you on the street, shay, look! closed eyes, to submit that for a competition, usually when you think of portrait, eyes are the window of the soul. there is an emotion there, with the eyes _ there is an emotion there, with the eyes closed, — there is an emotion there, with the eyes closed, rather than anything else _ eyes closed, rather than anything else i_ eyes closed, rather than anything else. i thought it was something a bit special— else. i thought it was something a
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bit special and that is why i submitted it to the competition. it must submitted it to the competition. must be submitted it to the competition. it must be lovely for you. in a way, we all do, but you get a glimpse into lives, that is the point of it, isn't it? they are notjust still images, they are, but it is about people. images, they are, but it is about --eole. , , . ., , images, they are, but it is about --eole. , ~ ., , ., , people. absolutely. what is really uni . ue people. absolutely. what is really unique about _ people. absolutely. what is really unique about portrait _ people. absolutely. what is really unique about portrait of— people. absolutely. what is really unique about portrait of britain, i people. absolutely. what is really. unique about portrait of britain, we get to see a glimpse into such a huge range of life in the uk. shay is one of them and we have images that were taken from the isle of skye, right the way down to brighton. again, as you saw on the screen, what is really exciting as they are shown back and they all see them in our day—to—day lives. whether we are on the high street, a train station, shopping centre, on big screens that essentially puts people's faces up in lights. shay, ou are people's faces up in lights. shay, you are now _ people's faces up in lights. shay, you are now famous! _ people's faces up in lights. shay, you are now famous! 0h. - people's faces up in lights. shay, you are now famous! oh. i've - people's faces up in lights. shay, i you are now famous! oh. i've been around the — you are now famous! oh. i've been around the world _ you are now famous! oh. i've been around the world quite _ you are now famous! oh. i've been around the world quite a _ you are now famous! oh. i've been around the world quite a bit, - you are now famous! oh. i've been around the world quite a bit, i've i around the world quite a bit, i've been _ around the world quite a bit, i've been to— around the world quite a bit, i've
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been to australia, _ around the world quite a bit, i've been to australia, china, - around the world quite a bit, i've been to australia, china, japan, i been to australia, china, japan, lndonesia — been to australia, china, japan, lndonesia, — been to australia, china, japan, indonesia, arabia, _ been to australia, china, japan, indonesia, arabia, everywhere.| been to australia, china, japan, i indonesia, arabia, everywhere. all over the _ indonesia, arabia, everywhere. all over the far— indonesia, arabia, everywhere. all over the far east. _ indonesia, arabia, everywhere. all over the far east.— indonesia, arabia, everywhere. all over the far east. now you are back home on the _ over the far east. now you are back home on the high _ over the far east. now you are back home on the high street _ over the far east. now you are back home on the high street and - over the far east. now you are back home on the high street and on - home on the high street and on breakfast. ~ ., home on the high street and on ltreakfast-_ breakfast. well, i am partly at home. i breakfast. well, i am partly at home- i am — breakfast. well, i am partly at home. i am very _ breakfast. well, i am partly at home. i am very glad, - breakfast. well, i am partly at home. i am very glad, shay, i breakfast. well, i am partly at i home. i am very glad, shay, you breakfast. well, i am partly at - home. i am very glad, shay, you are able to join — home. i am very glad, shay, you are able to join us _ home. i am very glad, shay, you are able to join us this _ home. i am very glad, shay, you are able to join us this morning - home. i am very glad, shay, you are able to join us this morning and - able to join us this morning and your picture is wonderful, thank you. thank you so much.- your picture is wonderful, thank you. thank you so much. lovely being here. you. thank you so much. lovely being here- thank — you. thank you so much. lovely being here- thank you. _ you. thank you so much. lovely being here. thank you, congratulations. -
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live from london, this is bbc news. first, to taiwan, where it is election day. polls have now closed on the island as as you can see, it is all hands on deck for the ballot count. the votes are being counted by representatives at individual polling stations, there are now no more votes being taken. the official results will be known by the end of
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the day but we could have some unofficial results in the next few

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